The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Seventeen

This is the continuation of a series of stories about men who died in World War 1, and whose photographs appeared in a publication called “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor.” The original post and explanation can be found at this link.  There will also be a complete listing of all the names researched at that same blog post.

LOST FACES OF WORLD WAR ONE: Our Nation’s Roll of Honor — Part Seventeen


MONTGALL Rufus Kansas City MOCAPTAIN RUFUS F. MONTGALL
Kansas City, Missouri
Killed in Action

Rufus Ford Montgall was born July 20, 1887 at St. Louis Missouri, son of William H. and Sarah E. “Sallie” (Ford) Montgall. According to “The Soldier from Independence: A Military Biography of Harry Truman,” by D.M. Giangreco, page 90, Rufus F. Montgall was “Truman’s second cousin on his father’s side.”

Rufus F. Montgall  attended local schools, and graduated in 1910 from the University of Pennsylvania.  The school’s catalog of that year shows the following activities: 1910 University of Pennsylvania Catalog. Rufus Ford Montgall. Phi Delta Theta (1) honor comm; (1) track; Vice President and Sales Manager American Sash and Door Co.; mem. Mid-Day, Country and Kansas City Athletic Clubs. Am Sash and Door Co. and “Rockhill Manor,” 43d and Locust Sts. Kansas City, Mo.

When he filled out his June 5, 1917 WW1 Draft Registration form, he noted that he was a member of the Officers Reserve Corps.  He was sent overseas, as part of the Quartermaster’s Corps. Supplies were essential to the American troops, and this Corps had been preparing to assault Cantigny. Capt. Montgall  was at Chaumont during the air raid.

This photo accompanied an account of Capt. Montgall's life in the June 25, 1918 edition of Lumber World Review. FROM: Library of Congress.

This photo accompanied an account of Capt. Montgall’s life in the June 25, 1918 edition of Lumber World Review. From Library of Congress on Flickr.

Strangely, one of the more detailed stories of how Captain Montgall died can be found in Lumber World Review, Vol 34, 1918 [June 25]–Tribute to the Late Capt. R.F. Mongall.
“Captain Rufus F. Montgall, age 31, formerly connected with the American Sash & Door Co., of Kansas City, Mo., and a member of General Pershing’s staff on the French front, was killed by a bomb dropped from an aeroplane just before midnight on the evening of Memorial Day, May 30.  Captain Montgall, with Col. Bertrand T. Clayton and Captain Harry A. Bullock, were occupied at their headquarters in a abandoned chateau, miles behind the fighting line, when an aeroplane dropped a bomb on the chateau and killed the three men, all of whom were associated with the quartermaster’s department, Col. Clayton being division quartermaster.”

Captain Rufus F. Montgall is buried in Somme American Cemetery, Bony, France in Plot C Row 14 Grave 13.  He also has a cenotaph in the Montgall plot at Elmwood Cemetery, Kansas City, Missouri.   The plaque, located at the latter Missouri location shows:

CAPT. RUFUS F. MONTGALL
QUARTERMASTER RESERVE CORPS
1st DIVISION, A.E.F.
KILLED NEAR BONVILIERS, NORTHERN FRANCE
WHILE IN ACTIVE SERVICE OF HIS COUNTRY
AT REST, GRAVE 14, ROW 14, BLOCK C
U.S. MILITARY CEMETERY
SOMME AMERICAN, BONY, AISNE, FRANCE


 

MOSHER Henry Falconer NYCAPTAIN HENRY E. MOSHER
Falconer, New York
Killed in Action

Henry Ephraim Mosher was born 18 June 1892 in Ellicott, Chautauqua, New York, son of Stiles B. & Martha M. (Cook) Mosher. His siblings included Harriett (Mrs. William Densmore) Gertrude, and Harry Mosher.

In 1900 he was living in Ellicott NY with his family, his father’s occupation was broom-maker.  At the time of his death, his family was living at 54 W. Mosher Street, Falconer, NY.

Men of 28th Infantry, 1st Div. bathing their feet after long hike into Soissons area. Near Montefontaine, France. July 16, 1918. The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art. The New York Public Library Digital Collections.

Men of 28th Infantry, 1st Div. bathing their feet after long hike into Soissons area. Near Montefontaine, France. July 16, 1918. The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art. The New York Public Library Digital Collections.

On June 14, 1917 he was sent overseas to serve in Europe in Co. K, 28th Infantry. His service include promotions to 2nd Lt. on March 22, 1917, to 1 Lt. on Oct 2 1917, then to Captain (temp) April 25, 1918.

He was killed in Action May 28, 1918 at Picardy, and buried at Civil City, Cantigny, France. After WWI ended, his remains were returned to the United States, and he was buried in his family’s plot at Pine Hill Cemetery, Falconer, Chautauqua Co. NY.  He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, and cited for gallantry in action.

 


 

NAUMAN Merle Arispe IowaPRIVATE MERLE L. NAUMAN
Arispe, Iowa
Killed in Action

Merle Leroy Nauman was born 9 December 1887 in Afton, Union County, Iowa, son of Reuben & Adaline (Herr) Nauman.   [SEE Genealogical Record of Reverend Hans Herr and his direct lineal descendants, page 416, Family of Adaline Herr (3459) and Reuben Nauman]

Merle’s siblings were, Mary Katharine, John Edwin, Susan Albina, Reatus, Earl, Ada Pearl, Bessie May, Roland Levi, Minnie Lela, Clarence Lloyd, Vernon Raymond, Muda Glee and Ruby Gladys.

Rare type of German trench mortar ; On Le Mort Homme or Dead Man's Hill ; Ask any Doughboy ; Direct hit by American artillery. The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photography; New York Public Library Digital Collections.

Rare type of German trench mortar ; On Le Mort Homme or Dead Man’s Hill ; Ask any Doughboy ; Direct hit by American artillery. The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photography; New York Public Library Digital Collections.

His 1917 WWI Military registration form lists him as a soldier, so possibly he joined the National Guard.  He was a member of the 42nd Division (Rainbow Division) that included most of the Middle and far Western States.  He probably trained at Camp Mills in Garden City, Long Island, N. Y.  He was assigned to the 168th Infantry, Machine Gun Company.  This particular division was involved in engagements at Red Cross Farm, St. Mihiel, Argonne, and Rhine.

He was killed in action on May 27, 1918, and like others who fell at that time, was at first buried near the battlefield.  In later years (probably 1920-1921) his body was returned to the United States, and re-interred in Greenlawn Cemetery, Afton, Union Co. Iowa.

 


 

NEHRENBERG David Drake NDPRIVATE DAVID D. NEHRENBERG
Drake, North Dakota
Killed in Action

David Daniel Nehrenberg was born 1 Jan 1897 in the Balfour-Drake Township area, son of Gustav John & Mary Louise (Bloedau) Nehrenberg.  His siblings included Charley F., Edward E., Lillie C., Rosa M., Ernest R., Elsie L. Emelia E., Henry H., Alfred P. Lille B., Peter J., Frederick, Sarah, Theodore, and Harrold.  Both of David’s parents had immigrated from Germany between 1872 and 1883. They were, like their neighbors, farmers.

The U.S., Adjutant General Military Records, 1631-1976 for the State of North Dakota, provided the following military information.  David Daniel Nehrenberg enlisted in the U.S. Army on 10 July 1917, his occupation at the time being a barber. He was assigned to Company D, 1st Infantry, North Dakota National Guard, at Minot, on July 10, 1917. He was called into federal service for the Great War (WWI). on July 15, 1917, his National Guard company becoming Company D, 164th Infantry.  He was shipped overseas Dec. 14, 1917. On Jan. 9, 1918 he became part of  Company I, 18th Infantry.

WW1: Occupation of the Ansauville Sector (Lorraine) by the First Division (Jan. 15-Apr. 3, 1918) from Youtube [U.S. National Archives]

———————–

Private David Daniel Nehrenberg was involved in the military actions at Ansauville (Lorraine) and at Cantigny (Picardy). He was killed in action, on Cantigny Front, May 2, 1918. Like many men who fell during WWI, he was at first buried, Grave No. 72, American Cemetery No. 176. He was reburied in the Nehrenberg family plot in Drake Cemetery, Drake, North Dakota.  The David D. Nehrenberg Post 32, American Legion of Drake, North Dakota was named in his honor.


 

NOON William New Bedford MAPRIVATE WILLIAM H. NOON
New Bedford, Massachusetts
Died of Wounds

William Henry Noon was born 10 Aug 1894 at New Bedford, Bristol Co., MA, son of Martin & Ellen (Cahoon/Coohun) Noon.  His siblings included John T., Martin A., Mary, Celia/Cecile, and Peter.

Newspapers in late June of 1918 revealed that  his residence was 241 State Street, New Bedford MA, and he was a member of E Co., 9th Infantry.   Before enlisting last July he was a mill operative in

New Bedford, MA.

William Henry Noon died of wounds received in battle, on 7 June 1918.  He was 24 years old.  I could not find him listed as buried in Europe, so I presume his body was returned to the United States after the war.  His father, Martin, is buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery, New Bedford, MA, so possibly William H. Noon rests there too.  Until I learn further, his burial place is unknown.


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