New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Goffstown

Photograph of the Goffstown
Soldiers and Sailors
Monument dedicated in
1916, from the Boston Globe.

It was less than a year before the World War would be declared by the United States that Goffstown dedicated a monument to its Civil War heroes on 16 June 1916.  The monument was a gift to the town of Goffstown by Henry W. Parker with special reference to Capt. Charles Stinson, Mr. Parker’s grandfather. The statue itself was made of Barre granite and stands 25 feet high showing a soldier in a “parade rest” stance.

People from many places in southern New Hampshire came to see the statue, and a dinner was served in the lower hall of the Opera House in town. There was also a parade, presentations, orations et al. [see monument newspaper notice]. Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Haverhill and Pike

Photograph showing the departure
of Grafton County NH Troops in 1917.

In 1912 the town of Haverhill New Hampshire celebrated its 150th anniversary of its settlement. At that time its almost 3,500 inhabitants celebrated in style with speeches, dinners and singing. They had no way of knowing that in just a few years their best and brightest young men would be sent off to war. Five would not return alive.

After WWI ended (by 1920) the population had dropped by about 100 people. The author of the History of the Town of Haverhill New Hampshire, William F. Witcher, published a list of all those who served in the military during World War I, along with providing a brief biography of each showing when they served and in what branch of the service. His work was invaluable in my own work presented here. Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Hudson

Old postcard view of Central Street and Post
Office Square, Hudson NH circa 1910

When World War I was declared in the United States, Hudson like its neighbors, provided young men to the “cause”–70 in all [by my estimate]. They served in all branches of the military–army, navy, marines, and fledgling army air force. Three of them would not return, paying the ultimate sacrifice.

The folks at home carried on, doing what they could to support those who had gone.  The close-knit community of Hudson became even closer, supporting each other. Money was raised for Liberty Bonds, Food Conservation Gardens were created and utilized. With shortages of certain foods and some other resources, people made do.  Women contributed as much or more than the men did. If my story and newspaper quotes are lengthy, it is because I felt no one who participated in the work, both the heroes of the war, and those who recognized them at home, should be omitted. Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Wagoner Burns Woodbury Bailey of New Boston

The town of New Boston, New Hampshire has always been good at recognizing their heroes.  They have plaques and memorials galore. They’ve included military events and participants in their history books. The New Boston Historical Society has a wonderful web site that includes a page on “New Boston in the Great War.”   To see a photograph and transcription of the WWI monument (and others) in New Boston, see: Nutfield Genealogy: New Boston, New Hampshire Military Honor Roll. Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of East Kingston

Photograph of East Kingston NH’s
Old Cemetery from the
2001 Annual Report

East Kingston New Hampshire is a small town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, wedged between the towns of Kingston, Exeter, Kensington, South Hampton, and Newton. In 1910 its population had already been dropping for a decade. During the World War I years, its citizen count would drop even more, to 384 in 1920. The town population would not start to grow again until after the Great Depression.

In 1917 when the United States announced it was to go to war, the young men of the East Kingston–18 men as shown on the WWI memorial, but 24 to my own count–did their duty. Of those, two would not return, namely Samuel H. Clifton and Leroy F. Goddard.  [Editor’s note: Leroy F. Goddard is not on recognized on the town’s WWI plaque, but should be]. Continue reading

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