Cow Stories: Bringing in the Cows, by Arthur Corning White

Photograph: Producer to Consumer, man milking a cow in Milford NH; c1909 J.P. Proctor. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

Photograph: Producer to Consumer, man milking a cow in Milford NH; c1909 J.P. Proctor. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division


“A precious, elusive element of poetry has gone out of farming with the passing of the old style smoke house, home made mittens, and those great, round, shining, shallow milk pans for raising of the cream.

Now, the rural population eats hams cured in Chicago, wears mittens knit by machinery in a factory near Boston, and buys butter made at some up-to-date creamery in a sanitary churn. Now, we farm by the clock. We milk in these hurried days of the twentieth century by a gasoline driven vacuum milker. We keep expense and receipt accounts with the punctilious accuracy of a C.P.A. We are forced to do our chores according to system, or very soon have the bank foreclosing and leaving us no farm and no chores to do. Working days, to be sure, are shorter than when I was a boy. And we certain produce more onions, cabbages, and pigs than we did then. But we’ve a lot more money invested in the process. Continue reading

Nashua New Hampshire’s First Women Physicians: Ella (Blaylock) Atherton and Katherine E. (Prichard) Hoyt

Ellen C. "Katherine E." (Prichard) Hoyt MD. Photograph from History of Nashua, NH by Judge Edward E. Parker, 1897

Ellen C. “Katherine E.” (Prichard) Hoyt, M.D. Photograph from History of Nashua, NH by Judge Edward E. Parker, 1897

In 1897 when the updated History of Nashua was published, the medical history (authored by Evan B. Hammond) reported the following: “Dr. Ella Blaylock and Dr. Katherine E. Prichard are the only two lady physicians of whom Nashua can boast, either in the past or present, and their success it a guarantee that their stay here is one of profit to themselves as well as to their patients. They were elected the same year (1891) to the Nashua Medical Association. She [Katherine E. Hoyt, M.D.] opened an office in 1889 and “although the first resident woman physician….” devoted her time entirely to gynecological work and obstetrics.

Both of these talented physicians became

Ella (Blaylock) Atherton, M.D.

Ella (Blaylock) Atherton, M.D.

members of the local Medical Association in the same year–1891.  Both specialized in women’s medicine, gynecology, and obstetrics.  Both married within the next few years. Katherine’s husband, Henry Hoyt, M.D.,  was also a physician and by 1900 she had moved with him to Sioux City, Iowa where he had a thriving practice. They later to Wenham, Massachusetts.  Ella married Hon. Henry Bridge Atherton, an attorney and editor of the Telegraph newspaper.  She remained in Nashua, with abdominal surgery as one of her skilled capabilities, and practicing medicine in that city for many years. Continue reading

Still More Manchester (NH) High School Graduates of 1888 and 1890

Some of the Manchester schools of 1890 including the High School that these students graduated from.  Sketches from the 1890 Report of Manchester NH Selectmen

Some of the Manchester schools of 1890 including the High School (upper middle drawing) that these students graduated from. Sketches from the 1890 Report of Manchester NH Selectmen

Today I finish my presentation of photographs and partial genealogies of members of the Manchester (New Hampshire) High School graduating class of 1888 and 1890.  All members of the 1888 Manchester High School graduating class was noted in the 1888 Manchester Annual Report, under the School’s Superintendent’s section. There were a few of the graduates I have not reported on because I do not have their photographs.

Group Portrait—Manchester High School 25th Reunion Class of 1889-90 [taken 8 September 1915].  G. I. Hopkins; Arthur Wheat; Tommy Morse; Mattie Chadwick (Hobbs); Ellen Brown; May Morse; Grace Smith; Cora Simmons; Bertha Young; Ethel Lauiprey; [Vennie] Bartlett; [Mertie] Hawkes (Preston); Sarah Price; Hattie Willard; May (Saxon); William Heath; Dick Hobbs; Will Saxon; [Norwise] Bean; Mrs. Bean; Margaret Manning; Mrs. Fay S. Manning; Edith Burnhaus; with other husbands and children of classmates. From the Manchester Historic Association Collection. Used with permission.

Group Portrait—Manchester High School 25th Reunion Class of 1889-90 [taken 8 September 1915]. G. I. Hopkins; Arthur Wheat; Tommy Morse; Mattie Chadwick (Hobbs); Ellen Brown; May Morse; Grace Smith; Cora Simmons; Bertha Young; Ethel Lauiprey; [Vennie] Bartlett; [Mertie] Hawkes (Preston); Sarah Price; Hattie Willard; May (Saxon); William Heath; Dick Hobbs; Will Saxon; [Norwise] Bean; Mrs. Bean; Margaret Manning; Mrs. Fay S. Manning; Edith Burnhaus; with other husbands and children of classmates. From the Manchester Historic Association Collection. Used with permission.

Twice previously I have posted photographs and genealogies about members of this same graduating class, i.e.:
Four Manchester (NH) High School Graduates of 1888: George W. Bartlett, Lillian J. Gray, Emma A. Putney, John B. McGuinness
Four More Manchester (NH) High School Graduates 1888:  Maude G. Fifield, Ethel G. Lamprey, Sarah G. “Sadie” Sawyer, Alice M. Stuart

Today’s post will include stories about: 1888 Class graduates: Warner Mitchell Allen, Ernest Augustus Royal, Mabel J. Brickett, Clara Ellen Brown, Annie Belle Goodwin, Seddie  J. Berry, Mary Augusta Hawley; and 1890 Class graduate: Mattie Sophronia Chadwick.

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New Hampshire Tidbits: The Song “My Old New Hampshire Home”

My Old New Hampshire Home, Historical American Sheet Music, Duke University Library, Digital Collection

My Old New Hampshire Home, Historical American Sheet Music, Duke University Library, Digital Collection

 

Considered a sentimental ballad, the tune “My Old New Hampshire Home,” was composed by Harry Von Tilzer, and lyricist Andrew B. Sterling in 1898. Neither of these two men were from New Hampshire, though they were intimately connected with the New England vaudeville shows.

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