New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Cornish and Plainfield

Since these towns are adjacent to each other in New Hampshire, I decided to write one story about both, based on the names on their WWI memorial plaques. Previously I wrote about Harry Dickinson Thrasher from Plainfield, and now I will mention the rest of the heroes.

Plainfield NH World War I honor roll. Photograph by Mary King, Director of the Philip Read Memorial Library. Used with permission.

Mary King, the Director of the Philip Read Memorial Library in Plainfield took a photographs of that town’s memorial and it is engraved as follows. [Editor’s notes not found on the honor roll monuments are in brackets].

★✫★✫★✫★✪🌟✪✫★✫★✫★★
HONOR ROLL

1914-1918
PLAINFIELD NH
★✫★✫★✫★✪🌟✪✫★✫★✫★★

ANACNOSTOPOULOS, COSTAS
BAILEY, FRED L.
BAILEY, WAYNE E.
CHADBOURNE, RALPH P.  [Wagoner, later Sergeant, Company I, 56th Engineers]
CLARK, CLARENCE H.
CROSSMAN, HOMER
–NA, ANDREW

Man and horse with gas mask. From Plainfield [NH] Historical Society; photograph from the Baynes collection. Used here with permission

ECCLESTON, WILLIAM E.
HADLEY, LEON
HAYWARD, CRISWOLD S.
HILL, ALBERT E.
HUNT, HUGH
HUSE, ERNEST L.
JENNEY, CHESTER E.
JENNEY, RAY F.
JORDAN, BYRON C.
KELSEY, HOWARD P.
KIMBALL, CHAS. F.
MEYETTE, JOSEPH C.
MORSE, ROY V.
PENNIMAN, T. KENNETH
PETERSON, HALL
PIERSON, NORMAN N.
RICE, HARRY
ROGERS, FRED A.
RUGGLE, HAROLD L.
THRASHER, HARRY D.
TOWNE, ELMER C.
WATSON, LEONARD
WEST, HAZEN F.
WILDER, ROBERT A.
WILDEY, PAUL B. Continue reading

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New Hampshire Tidbits: Old Recipes from the 19th Century

Image from page 130 of “The Boston Cooking School magazine of culinary science and domestic economics.” Janet McKenzie Hill; 1896, page 87

APPLE MERINGUE
To a quart of sifted apple sauce add the yolks of three eggs, butter the size of a small egg, a little nutmeg, a pinch of salt and sugar to taste. Put the mixture into a neat baking dish and cook until a light brown on top. Cover with a meringue made with the three whites of the eggs beaten with three tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar and a little lemon juice until stiff. Soft powdered sugar over the top, return to the oven long enough to color delicately and serve cold with sweetened and flavored cream. –October 20, 1881 New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette (Concord NH) page 1 Continue reading

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New Hampshire World War I Military: 2nd Lieut Harry Dickinson Thrasher of Plainfield and Cornish, Famed Sculptor

Photograph of sculptor, Harry Dickinson Thrasher, in Cornish NH standing outside the Studio of the Caryatids – Saint-Gaudens workshop in Cornish NH, after the winter of 1904 when this structure was built. Courtesy of Saint-Gaudens NHS and Mrs. Jay Russell. Used with permission.

I learned about Harry Dickinson Thrasher by chance while researching the WWI heroes of a seacoast town. The Portsmouth Herald newspaper of 21 Sep 1918 on page 4 posted this brief notice: “American Sculptor Was a Native of New Hampshire. New York, Sept 21, — Lt. Harry Dickinson Thrasher, a well known sculptor, was killed in action in France Aug 1, while serving with the camouflage section of the army, according to information received here today by the National Sculpture Society, of which he was a member. He was 36 years old and a native of Cornish, NH. In 1909 he won the scholarship of the American Academy in Rome. He enlisted as a private, was promoted to a sergeant and won his commission as lieutenant after his command had reached the front.” [Editor’s note:  I should mention here that in researching him I discovered that Harry D. Thrasher is my 8th cousin 1x removed, through his 2nd great-grandmother, Olive Eastman.]

Harry D. Thrasher’s name does not appear on the New Hampshire Adjutant General’s list of casualties of World War I, nor does it appear on the engraved listing of New Hampshire’s WWI Roll of Honor in Doric Hall of the NH State House, though I believe it should. His name IS on the Town of Plainfield memorial plaque to WWI that sits on the lawn of the Philip Read Memorial Library.  How many times a day do people pass by? Do they ever wonder about his name on the plaque–the only one engraved in bold letters?

Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Rye

Photograph of the Rye NH Veteran’s Monument by Richard Marsh. Used here with permission.

On 15 January 1920 a memorial tablet was unveiled in Rye Center, New Hampshire to commemorate those who died during the World War (WWI). Three men paid the ultimate sacrifice, namely: Thomas D. MacLaughlin, Wallace Elroy Rand and Phillip Willard Tucker.

The Portsmouth Herald newspaper of 15 Jan 1920 reported: “FINAL PLANS FOR TABLET UNVEILING IN TOWN OF RYE–“The unveiling of the memorial tablet to soldiers of all wars in which citizens of Rye have served will be a notable occasion in Rye Thursday evening and it is hoped the weather conditions will be favorable. The exercises will open at 7.30 o’clock out of doors with a selection by the Portsmouth Band which will furnish music for the occasion. Three Rye boys made the supreme sacrifice in the world war. Wallace Rand, Phillip Tucker, and Thomas McLoughlin, the latter being a summer resident, but well known. Continue reading

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Physician of Sanbornton and New Hampton NH: Dr. Artemus Lawrence Holmes Carr (1833-1862)

Dr. Artemus Carr of Sanbornton and New Hampton NH

He was only 29 years old when he died, and a youthful but serious face stares out at you from his gem-sized tintype portrait. He was the son of a physician, was well-educated, and married with two children. Those facts did not protect him from death. Did he catch the flu or consumption from one of his patients–we will probably never know.

Artemus Lawrence Holmes Carr was born 28 February 1833 in Sanbornton NH, son of Dr. John & Priscilla (Babb) Carr. He died on 17 May 1862 in New Hampton NH, aged 29 of consumption. He is listed in the 1840 publication of Woodman Sandbornton [sic] Academy as being a male student. The History of Sanbornton NH states that he “was a student in medicine with Prof. Albert Smith of Peterborough (and others), attended lectures at the Dartmouth and Bowdoin Medical Colleges, and graduated at the former 1858…He practiced his profession in New Hampton, with good success, four and one half years till his death…I will not leave you comfortless.” Continue reading

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