New Hampshire Suffragist, National & Local Civic Leader, Peace Proponent, Lecturer, Teacher: Mary Nettie Chase of Andover (1863-1959)

The Spirit of Woman Power, cover of Suffragist newsletter, December 1918. Internet Archive.

With the upcoming 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment being passed by the U. S.  Congress, my focus shifts to women (and men) who promoted suffrage in New Hampshire and nationally.  When Mary Nettie Chase’s name was mentioned on “The Turning Point,” web site, I had to wonder why I had not known about her.  All I knew was from this brief notice: “Mary N. Chase, Unknown City: President of the New Hampshire Auxiliary of the NWSA. Delegate at the NWSA 44th Convention in 1912. President from as early as 1906.” Continue reading

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Ten Genealogy Lessons “Game of Thrones” Teaches Us

Sketch of THE CORONATION CHAIR. Old and New London: a narrative of its history, its people, and its places by Walter Thornbury, 1873, page 461. Internet Archive.

During the television series Game of Thrones knowing how people were related, or who they descended from, becomes intrinsically important to each character and determines their fate. If you were related to any of the “great houses” of Westeros you could not avoid being swept up in the vast net of intrigue and conspiracy.

As for this story –spoilers ahead, sort of. I am using quotes from various seasons of the acclaimed HBO: Game of Thrones series to demonstrate ten genealogy lessons we can learn from watching “Game of Thrones.” Only one of these quotes was taken from this final season. They are not really plot spoilers, as the quotes are taken out of context, and the scene behind the words are not explained. Continue reading

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A New Hampshire Mother: Evelina “Eva” (Rollins) Sykes of Manchester (1870-1942)

Sykes family, from left to right: Kenneth, their mother [who I identified as Evalina (Rollins) Sykes], Irma, and Basiel; Manchester Historic Association. Used with permission.

It all started with one photograph.  Shown on the left the graphic is identified as: “Sykes family, from left to right: Kenneth, their mother, Irma, and Basiel.” [Based on the real birth dates I tend to think that instead it should be Basiel, mother/Irma and Kenneth.]  Possibly this was taken on a 4th of July, based on the United States flag and guns on display by the children. But before I continue with my story, a little congratulatory side-trip is in order.

This story originated while browsing through the Manchester Historic Association online photograph archives, which I seem to do frequently. That archive is a treasure trove, so kudos to everyone at that organization for the countless hours of identifying, scanning and uploading. I would highly suggest that anyone researching the Manchester New Hampshire area should look there first for photographs.  AND if you have any old photographs of the city, identify them and consider donating them to this fine organization. Continue reading

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New Hampshire Tidbits: The Best Mother

Jona-Red apple, grown in New Hampshire.

Regular readers of my Cow Hampshire blog know I’ve written many times about New Hampshire agriculture, and in particular about heirloom apple history. With Mother’s Day just around the corner, I thought I’d present a tidbit story that combines both subjects.

On 24 October 1878 the New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette of Concord published New Hampshire State Fair fruit being exhibited. Among them were: “Apples–Best five varieties, Best Mother, Chas H. Colburn, city; Foundling, Daniel Shirley, Goffstown; Baldwins and Northern Spy, Moses D. Page, Dover; Sweet Porters, J.P. Jameson, Dunbarton; Tolman Sweet, Leonard Robertson, Goffstown; Maiden’s Blush, B.W. Nichols, Bedford; second-best 10 varieties, Isaac Huse, city; best 10 varities, Golden Sweet, Hubbardston, C.C. Shaw, Milford; Blue Pearmains, R.M. Rollins, city; Baldwins, A.P. Joy, South Newmarket; Gravenstine, W.W. Howard, Milford.Continue reading

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Another Heroine of WWI: Pauline Hildreth Field (1885-1919)

Photograph of Pauline H. Field from her July 1918 U.S. passport.

Pauline Hildreth Field was not born in New Hampshire, but her paternal grandmother was. Pauline  was one of over 160 women World War I Red Cross workers who died during service during World War I. She did not work as a nurse, but rather was a member of the American Red Cross  in France, in Hospital Hut Service, performing “hospital recreational work.”

In 1912 Pauline H. Field was listed on the New York City Social Register along with her sister.  On 15 June 1912 she attended the commencement exercises at Temple University (Philadelphia PA), receiving a certificate at the Teacher’s College, for having completed the Normal Course in Kindergarten Training. Continue reading

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