The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Twenty

This is the continuation of a series of stories about men who died in World War 1, and whose photographs appeared in a publication called “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor.” The original post and explanation can be found at this link.  There will also be a complete listing of all the names researched at that same blog post.

LOST FACES OF WORLD WAR ONE: Our Nation’s Roll of Honor — Part Twenty


SCHATZ Fred John St Marys PAPRIVATE FRED JOHN SCHATZ
St. Mary’s Pennsylvania
Killed in Action

Fred John Schatz was born on Jan 31, 1894 in St. Mary’s, Elk Co. PA, eldest son of George B. & Kunigunda (Funk) Schatz.  They lived at 326 Walnut Street in St. Mary’s PA, and Fred’s father George worked as a “leather pounder” in the local tannery. In 1910, at the age of 16 Fred was already working full time as a “battery cleaner” in a dry battery works.  His siblings included John, Vitus, George Henry, Bernard, Mary, Carrie, Annie, Leo, Herman, Theresa and Charles. Continue reading

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Consumed by Fire: Weare New Hampshire’s William Worthley (1808-1874)

William Worthley

William Worthley, cooper of Weare NH, who died in a house fire. Photograph property of Janice Brown, not to be copied or used without her express written permission.

The notation “consumed by fire” on William Worthley’s death certificate sounded grim.  And it all began with the recent purchase of a CDV photo of him. It was taken at the Stephen Piper Studio in Manchester, New Hampshire.  And yes folks, you guessed it, we are related–William was my 2nd cousin 4x removed.   He was also a direct descendant of Jonathan Worthley who participated in Weare’s famous Pine Tree Riot.

William was born in Weare, and worked for many years there, working as a cooper, and raising a family.   There would have been a great local need for barrels, to fill with apples, or potatoes, or really anything that someone might want to sell or store.  He probably made a good living at it.  None of these skills helped him that terrible day in 1874. Continue reading

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The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Nineteen

This is the continuation of a series of stories about men who died in World War 1, and whose photographs appeared in a publication called “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor.” The original post and explanation can be found at this link.  There will also be a complete listing of all the names researched at that same blog post.

LOST FACES OF WORLD WAR ONE: Our Nation’s Roll of Honor — Part Nineteen


REAGAN Govan bernice LAPRIVATE GOVAN B. REAGAN
Bernice, Louisiana
Died of Wounds

Govan Bert Reagan was born 9 Dec 1896 in  Spearsville, Union Parish, Louisiana, son of Stephen J. & Clemantine (Tubb) Reagan. His many siblings include Katie P., Cora C., Georgia A., Minor E., Florence E., Rosa D., Effie O., Walton H., Bette E., Clara M., William O., Ottis E., Fannie H., Lonnie C., Clemon Kermit, and Eudine T.

Bain News Service, P. Americans with flame projectors, Cantigny. [no Date Recorded on Caption Card] [Image] Retrieved from the Library of Congress.

Bain News Service, P. Americans with flame projectors, Cantigny. 1918. Retrieved from the Library of Congress.

He served as a PFC, in Co. B, 28th Infantry, 1st Division.  He was wounded in battle, in France, and died as a result, on 30 May 1918. [The 28th Infantry was involved in the Battle of Cantigny, on May 28th, so probably he was initially injured at this time]. Continue reading

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An 1872 Manchester NH South Grammar School Autograph Book

autograph cover 2

Leather autograph book cover circa 1870

This leather-bound autograph book covers several years, from 1870-1874. The ink is quickly fading with age–the beautiful cursive script was written one hundred and forty-six (146) years ago.

Each pen stroke is deliberate, created when the inkwell and quill, not the modern pen, was still in use. The Spencerian style of penmanship was the standard then (not the more modern  Palmer method that many Manchester students were learning in later years). Continue reading

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The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Eighteen

This is the continuation of a series of stories about men who died in World War 1, and whose photographs appeared in a publication called “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor.” The original post and explanation can be found at this link.  There will also be a complete listing of all the names researched at that same blog post.

LOST FACES OF WORLD WAR ONE: Our Nation’s Roll of Honor — Part Eighteen


ODRISCOLL George P East Boston MAPRIVATE GEORGE P. O’DRISCOLL
East Boston, Massachusetts
Killed in Action

George Patrick O’Driscoll was born 24 March 1895
in East Boston, Massachusetts, son of Michael T. & Catherine F. (Burns) O’Driscoll, and grandson of Dennis & Ellen (Fallon) O’Driscoll and Thomas & Rosanna Burns.

At the time of his draft registration, George P. O’Driscoll was an ironworker for PW Fletcher of 155 Border Street, East Boston MA.  He entered the service in September, 1917, with the first detachment sent from East Boston to Camp Devens. He was attached to Company E of the 60th Infantry and was afterward transferred to Company F of the 301st Infantry. Continue reading

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