New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Amherst

Lithograph Poster, Do Your Part–Buy US Government Loans. Herbert Andrew Paus aratist. Niagara Lithography. Prints and Engravings Collection, Historic New England. c1917-1918

During WWI all the citizens of Amherst were involved in some way. By October of 1917 the National Liberty Loan Committee had placed Amherst in a “zone” along with Milford, Wilton, Lyndeborough, Temple, Mont Vernon and Hollis, to raise subscriptions (funds) as a group in the form of Liberty Bonds. Local newspaper advertising was already advocating the eating of more fish than meat in order to ship beef across the ocean for the troops and starving Europeans. The town’s people held regular Red Cross Membership drives led by women district leaders, raised money to support that organization and made clothing and bandages for the troops. ‘Patriotic’ acts were in abundance. Continue reading

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New Hampshire in WWI: The Supreme Sacrifice

I had a conversation recently with a man who had researched World War One for six months and put together an exhibition about local men involved. Briefly we discussed the term “supreme sacrifice,” as I mentioned that I thought his number of WWI deaths was rather low. His retort was that only those who made the “supreme sacrifice” were included in his count.

I was a bit aghast, but the researcher was a veteran, so I was not about to diss him.  I let it go.  Perhaps that is what they are teaching the “boys” these days–that they must die in battle, in a burning flash of glory, down with the ship, and all that, in order to count as having made the “supreme sacrifice.” Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Benton

Benton Town Hall with veteran monuments and U.S. flag.

When the United States entered WWI, the town of Benton New Hampshire had about 200 residents (219 in 1910, 177 by 1920).  Of these at least four men went into military service. One would not return home alive. When the war ended, the Town of Benton wanted to commemorate those who participated in several wars, War of 1812, Mexican War and World War I. Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Holderness

Holderness NH Veteran Monument, located next to the town’s public library.

Holderness in Grafton Co. New Hampshire has been, from it’s beginning, a farming community. Today its population swells during the summer months when vacationers and tourists arrive to enjoy the water views, cool breezes and boating or swimming.  When the United States entered World War I in 1917, the town’s population was about 925 people.  Of those at least 19 of Holderness’ youth went into military service.  Two of these men would make the ultimate sacrifice and not return home. Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Hollis

Pre WWI Hollis Town Common.

The town of Hollis New Hampshire sent 43 men to service during World War I. The residents who remained at home did their part too–participating in the Red Cross, raising funds for War bonds, demonstrating thrift in the kitchens and obedient to the meatless and wheatless days.  When the war ended, it was a difficult transition back to normalcy. Continue reading

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