New Hampshire in WWI: The Cadillac Shrapnel Car

Photograph of “Caddie” the Cadillac that earned recognition for its service in World War I., from the 1919 Nashua Telegraph and several other newspapers.

On the 25 November 1919 the Nashua Telegraph (Nashua NH) newspaper contained an advertisement for H.C. LINTOTT, Cadillac Agent, 25 Main Street in Nashua New Hampshire. The ad stated that “Caddie” would be on exhibition in that showroom. Herbert Charles Lintott was at first a mechanic and then the first automobile dealer in the city of Nashua. Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Fireman 3d Class Charles Oliver Barnard USN of Plymouth

Charles Oliver Barnard was born 30 August 1890 in Plymouth, New Hampshire son and second child of Wesley G. & Eveline (Sanborn) Barnard. In the 1900 U.S. Census he is shown living with his parents and sibling John C. Barnard. He completed his WWI Registration form on 5 June 1917 in Plymouth NH, stating he was farming for himself. He claimed occupation and physical disability as a reason for a military exemption. He describes himself as of medium height, stout with blue eyes and light brown hair. Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Nurse: Margaret Mary Tymon of Rumney

Margaret Mary Tymon, from 1918 Passport Application

Margaret Mary Tymon was born 21 March 1879 in the small town of Rumney, New Hampshire, daughter of Andrew & Margaret (Mayer/ Meagher/Mahar) Tymon. Her parents were Irish immigrants who came to the United States about 1856 and settled at first in Salem MA (for 9 years).

Her family then moved to Rumney NH about 1872 where her father became a naturalized citizen (November1877), and she and a brother, Andrew were born.  Later the family moved to Massachusetts and Connecticut. Continue reading

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New Hampshire in WWI: Heroes of Dublin

Aerial view of Dublin New Hampshire in the 1950s. Photograph property of J.W. Brown

I have been writing about the towns in New Hampshire that had reported deaths in World War I, focusing on those places with residents who made the supreme sacrifice. I am making an exception for Dublin, New Hampshire.

This is because the Dublin Historical Society is holding an important event called “Lest We Forget: Dublin’s Patriots in WWI” from August 11 to August 26, 2018, 10 AM to 1 PM. Their Opening Reception will be held on August 13th starting at 5:30 PM. The event is easy to find, as its being held in the top floor of Dublin New Hampshire’s Town Hall [1120 Main Street].

The local newspaper, the Monadnock Ledger-Transcript, wrote a nice story about what you might expect to see there, and provided some photographs of some the artifacts that will be on exhibit. The story mentions only a few of the many soldiers and the nurse from the town who were in service. So how would you know if you had a connection with them? Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Peterborough

Postcard of Peterborough’s original wooden
honor roll for WWI service. From collection of
J.W. Brown.

When the United States entered the World War in April of 1917, the citizens of Peterborough rallied to service.  Over 100 men joined or rejoined the armed service branches in some capacity. By the time the war ended, four gold stars would represent the heroic lives of those who would never return home–William H. Cheney, Edward F. Greene, Carroll D. Harpell, and David Johns.

Even before the war ended, service was being recognized on an Honor Roll made of wood, and hand painted by A.L. Holt. The board stood south of the Town House building on the west side of Grove Street. The names of those who fell or died in service were preceded by a gold star.  An old postcard of that sign is shown here.  On 11 November 1923 two bronze plaques replaced the wooden sign.  My own list combing the names from both is shown in the honor roll directly below.
Continue reading

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