An 1872 Manchester NH South Grammar School Autograph Book

autograph cover 2

Leather autograph book cover circa 1870

This leather-bound autograph book covers several years, from 1870-1874. The ink is quickly fading with age–the beautiful cursive script was written one hundred and forty-six (146) years ago.

Each pen stroke is deliberate, created when the inkwell and quill, not the modern pen, was still in use. The Spencerian style of penmanship was the standard then (not the more modern  Palmer method that many Manchester students were learning in later years). Continue reading

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The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Eighteen

This is the continuation of a series of stories about men who died in World War 1, and whose photographs appeared in a publication called “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor.” The original post and explanation can be found at this link.  There will also be a complete listing of all the names researched at that same blog post.

LOST FACES OF WORLD WAR ONE: Our Nation’s Roll of Honor — Part Eighteen


ODRISCOLL George P East Boston MAPRIVATE GEORGE P. O’DRISCOLL
East Boston, Massachusetts
Killed in Action

George Patrick O’Driscoll was born 24 March 1895
in East Boston, Massachusetts, son of Michael T. & Catherine F. (Burns) O’Driscoll, and grandson of Dennis & Ellen (Fallon) O’Driscoll and Thomas & Rosanna Burns.

At the time of his draft registration, George P. O’Driscoll was an ironworker for PW Fletcher of 155 Border Street, East Boston MA.  He entered the service in September, 1917, with the first detachment sent from East Boston to Camp Devens. He was attached to Company E of the 60th Infantry and was afterward transferred to Company F of the 301st Infantry. Continue reading

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Promote Your Blog: A Genealogist’s Potluck Guide

Postcard picnic Royal brand fish delicacies

Chromolithograph print, “Royal Brand” fish delicacies, advertising card, Boston Public Library, Collection of images on Flickr.

My favorite genealogy resource is my blog, Cow Hampshire. It is not just a place where I write and share genealogy and history stories about New Hampshire. My blog is a place where I gather new information from guests who comment.  My blog is also the medium where I can acknowledge other bloggers, and share resources with them–from genealogy research sites to collections of copyright-free graphics and primary documents.

A genealogy blog is much like a picnic–you bring the basket full of goodies, spread the blanket, and people arrive anxious to feast on your knowledge, right? This premise isn’t true at all, but there are simple things you can do to attract and engage more readers. It only takes ten changes or additions to what you probably do now, to better promote your blog, and attract your audience, like ants. In this case, you want the uninvited guests along with the invited. Continue reading

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The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Seventeen

This is the continuation of a series of stories about men who died in World War 1, and whose photographs appeared in a publication called “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor.” The original post and explanation can be found at this link.  There will also be a complete listing of all the names researched at that same blog post.

LOST FACES OF WORLD WAR ONE: Our Nation’s Roll of Honor — Part Seventeen


MONTGALL Rufus Kansas City MOCAPTAIN RUFUS F. MONTGALL
Kansas City, Missouri
Killed in Action

Rufus Ford Montgall was born July 20, 1887 at St. Louis Missouri, son of William H. and Sarah E. “Sallie” (Ford) Montgall. According to “The Soldier from Independence: A Military Biography of Harry Truman,” by D.M. Giangreco, page 90, Rufus F. Montgall was “Truman’s second cousin on his father’s side.”

Rufus F. Montgall  attended local schools, and graduated in 1910 from the University of Pennsylvania.  The school’s catalog of that year shows the following activities: 1910 University of Pennsylvania Catalog. Rufus Ford Montgall. Phi Delta Theta (1) honor comm; (1) track; Vice President and Sales Manager American Sash and Door Co.; mem. Mid-Day, Country and Kansas City Athletic Clubs. Am Sash and Door Co. and “Rockhill Manor,” 43d and Locust Sts. Kansas City, Mo.

When he filled out his June 5, 1917 WW1 Draft Registration form, he noted that he was a member of the Officers Reserve Corps.  He was sent overseas, as part of the Quartermaster’s Corps. Supplies were essential to the American troops, and this Corps had been preparing to assault Cantigny. Capt. Montgall  was at Chaumont during the air raid. Continue reading

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Sanbornton New Hampshire Farmer: Thomas T. Cawley, Jr. (1789-1869)

Thomas T. Cawley Jr. of Sanbornton NH

Thomas T. Cawley Jr. of Sanbornton NH

Looking very much like a Yankee farmer, Thomas T. Cawley, Jr. peers out from the photograph.  He is elderly, white haired, and grizzled by the time this photograph was taken at B.N. Poor, Pike’s Block in Franklin, New Hampshire.

His father Jonathan Cawley had been the first to settle in Sanbornton, New Hampshire, on Lot No. 31, 2nd Division “near the Cawley Pond, which received from him its name.”  Thomas T. Cawley, Jr.  lived first on a farm given to him by his father, at the north end of Lot No. 28, 2d Division, afterwards the Ede Taylor place (near Sites) until 1830, then he bought the Daniel Tilton farm near the school-house of Dist. No. 8 which had been mortgaged to the Exeter Academy.  He lived there until his death.  He raised his family in the same town where he was born and died, and is buried with several generations of Cawley’s in the Cawley Pond Cemetery, in Sanbornton, NH. Continue reading

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