National Women’s History Month: Weaving New Hampshire’s Stories In Granite

 2015 Women's History Month Theme: Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives


March 2015: Women’s History Month Theme: Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives, from the National Women’s History Project

This year [2015] is the 35th anniversary of the National Women’s History Project.  The group grew from a few concerned educators and history activists in California, to  a more substantial collective of both women and men today.   Since 1909 various “Women’s Days” have been held, but it was not until 1987 that the entire month of March was designated as Women’s History Month. Continue reading

Posted in History, New Hampshire Women | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The CALL and GREELEY Families of Boscawen, New Hampshire

Emma S. (Call) Greeley of Boscawen NH

Emma S. (Call) Greeley of Boscawen NH

Let is first be known that this is not a listing of all CALL and/or GREELEY Families in New Hampshire, nor even in the Boscawen NH area.  I happened to purchase three interesting photographs on Ebay–that of Levi Fellows Call, his wife Mary (McCoy) Call, and his sister, Emma S. (Call) Greeley.    To learn more about the people behind the faces, it meant researching the Call and Greeley families.  My focus was more on the New Hampshire CALL lineage.

It is interesting to note my discovery that I am related to the people pictured, albeit distantly through their [Mehetable and other] JACKMAN lines.

Continue reading

Posted in Genealogy, History | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Hampshire Epitaph: Killed With An Axe By An Insane Brother

Tombstone of Gilman Spaulding, found in the Central Cemetery of New Ipswich, NH.  Photograph by Judy, originally posted on Find-A-Grave.  Used here with her written permission.

Tombstone of Gilman Spaulding, found in the Central Cemetery of New Ipswich, NH. Photograph by Judy Hohenadel, originally posted on Find-A-Grave. Used here with her written permission.

An epitaph on a stone located in Central Cemetery in New Ipswich, New Hampshire is succinctly understated:

“Mr. Gilman
Spaulding
was kill’d with an ax
by an insane Brother,
Sept. 19, 1842
AEt. 38.”

I was recently contacted about this by an email of John M. Poltrack. I became as curious as he was, and was determined to learn more. In September of 1842 several newspapers noted the event, all with the same oddly worded story.

Continue reading

Posted in History, R.I.P, Really Old News | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Hampshire 1877: Disastrous Mardi Gras Transplant

Proclamation by the King of the Carnival, 1936, Boston Public Library, Print Department

Proclamation by the King of the Carnival, 1936, Boston Public Library, Print Department

The attempt to transplant the Old World ceremonies of Carnival and Mardi Gras to our northern soil has always proved disastrous. Southern cities have had considerable success in frolics of this kind, but as a rule such attempts elsewhere turned out a sad burlesque and there has been a feeling of relief when they were well over.

From the tone of the New York papers it seems that the “Yankee Carnival” there was not a success. The Herald speaks of the “gimcrack day procession, a two mile funeral of show wagons and hand-bill throwing,” “the gingerbread night procession”; the World tells of the visit of King Carnival in “a somewhat heterogeneous fashion”; and the Times has a quite racy and funny account of the show under the head, “the festival of fools, inane stupidity and pageantry.” The great procession appears to have been a long line of advertising vans; or, as one paper expresses it, “a grand combination of dealers, an organized company of advertisers, who occupied the public streets, impeded travel, and nauseated passengers with clap-trap and vulgarity.”

May 22, 1877, Farmer’s Cabinet (Amherst NH), Vol 75, Issue 46, Page 2

Posted in Current Events, Really Old News | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

A New Hampshire Valentine Warning of 1850

00valentineST. VALENTINE’S–On Thursday, St. Valentine will hold his annual festival. Single ladies and gentlemen may expect the usual quantity of favors, while “the little god Cupid” acts as post-boy. Old bachelors should fortify their bosoms with an extra covering of linen, as the mischievous archer sometimes plays the dickens with tender breast-works.

Romantic girls should exercise caution in the distribution of their gilt-edged missives, or they may find love-lorn swains susceptible enough to admit the “soft impeachment.” Finally, ladies, one and all, look out for the males on the morn of Valentine; and if you get caught, avenge yourselves by lass-ooing the rogues who wish to entangle you.

From: February 12 1850; New-Hampshire Gazette (Portsmouth, NH) Vol XCVI, Issue 7, page 2.

Posted in History, Holidays, Really Old News | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment