Not New Hampshire: The Lost Faces of World War One

HONOR ROLL BANNER 2During World War 1 American newspapers sometimes printed photographs of those who died in action or from disease.  One publisher called it “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor,” and bi-weekly showed a pictorial of 25 small photos of young men who had died in the wartime effort. [Editor’s note: It has been suggested that these poster-like newspapers were part of the New York Times publication.]

American losses in World War 1 were less than its counterparts in Europe. Though the numbers even today are not definitive, it is estimated (by the International Encyclopedia of the First World War) that there were 116,516 deaths, and approximately 320,000 sick and wounded of the 4.7 million who served. “The USA lost more personnel to disease (63, 114) than to combat (53, 402), largely due to the influenza epidemic of 1918.” WGBH additionally provides a table showing all losses in that War.

Almost all of the photographs I have collected are not from New Hampshire.  This does not make the loss any less.   Starting today, and during the month of June 2016, I will be publishing the faces and background of these men, as much as I can track them.


ANDERSON Robert Wilson SC

From a 1918 “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor” photo page. Please note that the picture caption is incorrect, and should read “N.C.” not “S.C.”

-ANDERSON, Lieut. Robert B.-
Wilson, N.C. (NOT SC)
Killed in Action
29 May 1918

The first face is that of Lieut. Robert B. Anderson.  The reason that he is shown first is because he died May 29, 1918, ninety eight years ago, to today–to this very day.   He was the son of Dr. William Staton Anderson & Isabell Muir (Banks) Anderson, born 15 October 1891 [per his WW1 registration form].

Cantigny

Photograph of American’s before the Battle of Cantigny, WW1, from The Story of the Great War, by Roland G. Usher, Ph.D., 1917

First Lieutenant Robert B. Anderson, of the 28 Infantry, 1st Division, Company A was mortally wounded at the Battle of Cantigny (the first American battle and offensive of WW1) on May 29th, 1918, dying at an aid station a short time later. For his bravery he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (US) and the Croix DeGuerre (France). During advance to reinforce the front line, he was shot in the calf and groin.

He was not married, and had no children. Besides his parents, he left behind half-siblings and full-siblings: Dr. Paul Vernon Anderson, Wade Hampton Anderson, Stephen Woodard Anderson, Jesse Staton Anderson Jr., and James Banks Anderson.

The Robert B. Anderson Post No. 13, American Legion, is named after him.  Robert B. Anderson is buried in Maplewood Cemetery, Wilson, Wilson County, North Carolina.  The Wilson County Public Library has published a story about him, along with providing several of his letters written home to family.


ANGLIN Henry Fairmont WV – ANGLIN, Corp. Henry –
Co. I 26th Infantry
Wounded 28 May 1918 Cantigny France
Died 31 May 1918 aged 24 years

Corporal Henry Anglin was wounded at Cantigny France, that first American battle of World War 1.  He perished from his injuries 3 days later.

Henry P. Anglin was born 31 Aug 1894 Mt. Clare, Harrison, West Virginia, son of Octavin & R. Catharine (Shawkey) Anglin, and grandson of William & Sarah “Sally” Anglen.  Henry’s father was a coal miner from Virginia, and they sometimes spelled their last name “Anglen.”  In 1900 the family was living in Grant, Harrison Co., WV.  Henry was not married, and he left no children, but he did leave his parents and siblings behind.  He is buried at East Oak Grove Cemetery, Morgantown, West Virgina.

Siblings include (but not limited to): Grover C. Anglen, Sarah M. Anglen, William H. Anglen, Ai G. Anglen, Emit Anglen, Altie Anglen.


Links to additional stories will be posted here.

Not New Hampshire: The Lost Faces of World War One
[THIS STORY, see above]
– Lieut. Robert B. Anderson (Wilson, NC); Killed in Action
– Corp. Henry Anglin (Fairmont, WV); Died of Wounds

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Two
– Private Clemmie Atkinson (Denmark, OR); Died of Wounds
– Private George Baldwin (Chicago, IL); Killed in Action
– 2nd Lieut. Maurice E. Barnett (Neenha, WI); Killed in Action
– Sergt. Earl C. Bates (Columbus, OH); Died of Wounds
– Private Charlie [Charley] B. Bolden (Porterville, AL); Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Three
– Private Bernard H. Bolt (South Bethlehem, PA); Died of Wounds
– Corporal Charles O. Brown (Poplar Bluff, MO); Killed in Action
– Private Samuel Buchalter (Colchester, CT); Killed in Action
– Captain Harry A. Bullock (Cambridge, MA); Killed in Action
– Private Rollin M. Cannon (Westminster, MA); Died of Wounds

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Four
– Lieut. Calvin Capps (Lucama, NC) Died of Wounds
– Private Charles H. Carey (Salem, OH) Died of Wounds
– Private James F. Carson (Dutton, AL) Died of Wounds
– Sergt. Thurston R. Chamberlain (Guerneville, CA) Died Airplane Accident
– Lieut. Henry W. Clarke (Boston, MA) Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Five
– Pvt. Desire Cloutier (Somerset, MA) Killed in Action
– Trumpeter Charles C. Coe (Chicago, IL) Died of Wounds
– Pvt. James D. Coleman (Jerseyville, IL) Died of Wounds
– Pvt. Ralph Cooke (Boston, MA) Died of Wounds
– Pvt. Lloyd R. Coulbourn (Salisbury, MD) Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Six
– Pvt. Albert L. Cox (Weiser, Idaho) Killed in Action
– Pvt. Paul F. Cross (Shelbyville, Indiana) Killed in Action
– Corp. Edward F. McCutcheon (Brooklyn, NY) Killed in Action
– Capt. Donald F. Duncan (St. Joseph, Missouri) Killed in Action
– Pvt. Stanislaw Dziengeleski (Perth Amboy, New Jersey) Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Seven
– Lieut. Henry Leslie Eddy (New Britain, CT) Killed in Action
– Pvt. Richard W. Ellis (Janesville, Wisconsin) Killed in Action
– Pvt. Harry H. Eschbach (Lancaster, PA) Killed in Action
– Corp. Herman L. Evans (Lebanon Junction, Kentucky) Killed in Action
– Pvt. Clarence Fields (Ashland, KY) Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Eight
– Corp. Robert McCaughin Fischer (Minneapolis, MN) Killed in Action
– Corp. William Fleming (Cuba, KS) Killed in Action [Second Missouri Engineers]
– Corp. John C. Foster (Greenfield, IL) Killed in Action
– Lieut. Judson P. Galloway (Newburgh, NY) Killed in Action
– Lieut. Arthur R. Gaylord (Minneapolis, MN) Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Nine
– Corp. Bernard A. Gill (McLoud, Oklahoma) Killed in Action
– Lieut. Duncan Ross Grant (NYC, NY) Killed Airplane Accident
– Pvt. Arthur E. Halberg (Princetown, Illinois) Killed in Action
– Pvt. Daniel Harder (Almyra, Arkansas) Killed in Action
– Corp. Emile Henckell (Birmingham, Alabama) Died of Wounds

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Ten
– Pvt. Henry O. Hinckley (Peckville, PA) Killed in Action
– Pvt. Myrl D. Hoopingarner (White Pigeon, Michigan) Killed in Action
– Pvt. William H. Hornby (Fall River, MA) Died of Wounds
– Lieut. Stephen P. Hoskins (Warren, PA) Killed in Action
– Lieut. Eugene P. Hubbard (Chatham, NJ) Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One – Part Eleven
– Private George Johnson (Brooklyn NY) Killed in Action
– Lieut. William Campbell Johnson (Eau Claire, Wisconsin) Killed in Action
– Lieut. Malcolm M. Johnstone  (Arlington, Washington) Killed in Action
– Lieut. Hamlet P. Jones (Kaufman, Texas) Killed in Action
– Private Ira H. Justice (Trimble, Tennessee) Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One – Part Twelve
– Sergeant Joseph Kaczor (Junction City Wisconsin) Died of Wounds
– Lieutenant Gordon Kaemmerling (New York City) Killed in Action
– Sergeant George Kay, Dunkirk (New York) Died of Wounds
– Private James Bernard Kellum (Maysville Kentucky) Killed in Action
– Private Martin P. Kennedy (Holyoke, Massachusetts)  Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One – Part Thirteen
– Private William Kershaw (Coffeen Illinois) Killed in Action
– Private John E. King (Asheboro North Carolina) Died of Wounds
– Sergeant Harry Klein (Newark New Jersey) Killed in Action
– Private Edward G. Kohl (St. Charles Missouri) Killed in Action
– Lieutenant Elwood F. Kresge (Northampton, Pennsylvania) Killed in Airplane Accident

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Fourteen
– Private Charles F. Kruse (Jerseyville, IL) Killed in Action
– Private John F. Lindsay (Boston, MA) Died of Wounds
– Private John W. Low (Dallas, TX) Killed in Action
– Private Joseph W. Luther (Morrisdale PA) Killed in Action
– Sergeant John Macikowski (Buffalo NY) Died of Wounds

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Fifteen
– Private Frank E. Malone (Horeb, Wisconsin) Died of Wounds
– Private Allen Malpass (Shelton, Washington) Killed in Action
– Corporal Clifford R. Manchester (Newark, New Jersey) Killed in Action
– Lieutenant John D. Mathis (Americus, Georgia) Killed in Action
– Corporal James J. McGrath (Saxonville, Massachusetts) Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Sixteen
– Corporal Samuel W. Myers (Lancaster PA) Died of Wounds
– Private Frank J. Michael (St. Louis MO) Killed in Action
– Corporal [Musician] Frederick I. Miles (Geneva, Ohio) Killed in Action
– Private Clyde Millard (Montpelier, Indiana) Died of Wounds
– Private Ira Miller (Silver Spring, PA) Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Seventeen
– Captain Rufus F. Montgall (Kansas City, MO) Killed in Action
– Captain Henry E. Mosher (Falconer, NY) Killed in Action
– Private Merle L. Nauman (Arispe, Iowa) Killed in Action
– Private David D. Nehrenberg (Drake, North Dakota) Killed in Action
– Private William H. Noon (New Bedford, MA) Died of Wounds

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Eighteen
– Private George P. O’Driscoll (East Boston, MA) Killed in Action
– Private Everett Powers (Carlisle, Iowa) Killed in Action
– Lieutenant Wellborn S. Priddy (Chicago, IL) Died of Wounds
– Lieutenant Harry Walter Prince (W. Philadelphia, PA) Died, Airplane Accident
– Mechanic William A. Purcell (Philadelphia, PA) Killed in Action

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Nineteen
– Private Govan B. Reagan (Bernice, LA) Died of Wounds
– Lieut. Richard B. Reed (Van Wert, Ohio) Died, Airplane Accident
– Sergeant Joseph Holgate Regnold (North Judson, IN) Killed in Action
– Sergeant Benjamin Saltzman (Brooklyn, NY) Died of Wounds
– Private Louis C. Sayer (Vergas, MN) Died of Wounds

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Twenty
– Private Fred John Schatz (St Mary’s PA) Killed in Action
– Private August Schuster (Erie, PA) Killed in Action
– Sergeant Stephen George Sherman (Minneapolis MN) Killed in Action
– Private Emmet C. Smith (Hardin, Montana) Killed in Action
– Lieutenant George Squires (St. Paul, MN) Killed in Airplane Accident
– Lieutenant Joseph G. Trees (Pittsburgh, PA) Killed in Airplane Accident

The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Twenty-One
– Private Victor Tuttle (Newport, Maine) Killed in Action
– Private Thomas Whalen (Superior, WY) Died of Wounds
– Captain Jewett Williams (Athens, GA) Killed in Action
– Corporal Harry Williams (Webster/Bisher MN) Killed in Action,
– Private Lloyd A. Worley (Mount Vernon OH) Killed in Action
– Sergt. August T. Ziolkowski (Milwaukee, WI) Died of Wounds

[Editor’s note. 3 September 2016, I still have several hundred photographs to work on, however, for the next month or two I will be writing about New Hampshire military.]

 

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26 Responses to Not New Hampshire: The Lost Faces of World War One

  1. Thank you for remembering these soldiers and learning and sharing their stories.

  2. Pingback: New Hampshire’s 2016 Memorial Day | Cow Hampshire

  3. Pingback: The Missing Faces of World War One — Part Two | Cow Hampshire

  4. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Three | Cow Hampshire

  5. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Four | Cow Hampshire

  6. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Five | Cow Hampshire

  7. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Six | Cow Hampshire

  8. I looked around a little for the publisher, and found one intriguing tidbit, a notice in the 3 October 1918 New York Times that reads: “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor — ‘Dulce et decorum est pro patri mori.’ Mid-Week Pictorial for Oct. 3d. Ten cents at all news stands.”

    So maybe check what you have, see if it was dated mid-week and sold for 10-cents.

  9. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Seven | Cow Hampshire

  10. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Eight | Cow Hampshire

  11. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Nine | Cow Hampshire

  12. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Ten | Cow Hampshire

  13. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Eleven | Cow Hampshire

  14. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Twelve | Cow Hampshire

  15. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Thirteen | Cow Hampshire

  16. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Fourteen | Cow Hampshire

  17. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Fifteen | Cow Hampshire

  18. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Sixteen | Cow Hampshire

  19. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Seventeen | Cow Hampshire

  20. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Eighteen | Cow Hampshire

  21. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Nineteen | Cow Hampshire

  22. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Twenty | Cow Hampshire

  23. Pingback: The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Twenty-One | Cow Hampshire

  24. Tom Dailey says:

    I have the ORIGINAL issue of “Mid Week Pictorial”, printed by the NY Times, dated 11 July, 1918 (Vol VII – No. 19), which this posting references. As a boy, growing up in Kansas City MO, “Montgall Street” was a mere two blocks away… now I know for whom it was named.

  25. Tom Dailey says:

    Forgot to mention… my post refers to Captain Rufus F. Mongall

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