Faces of the EVERETT FAMILY of New London, Salisbury and Concord New Hampshire

New London's main street circa 1900. From an old postcard.

New London’s main street circa 1900. From an old postcard.

We have to start with the father in order to know the sons. Jonathan-5 Everett came from a long and well-traced line that I have included in the genealogy below. Jonathan moved from Attleboro, Massachusetts to New London NH before 1789 (according to the New London NH town’s history). He lived in a log cabin, and later in a frame house. He was an influential citizen. He married Mary Messinger/Messenger and produced eight children.

In a previous¬† story I wrote about this same Jonathan & Mary (Messinger) Everett’s daughter Mary, who married the Honorable Anthony Colby, a governor of New Hampshire. In this story I will show photographs of Mary’s brothers, David and Daniel Everett, along with their wives, and their family trees. Continue reading

Penacook New Hampshire’s Acclaimed Modernist Artist: Omer Thomas Lassonde (1903-1980)

Self portrait of Omer Lassonde. Photograph copyright Boscawen Historical Society. Used here with their permission.

Self portrait of Omer Lassonde. Photograph copyright Boscawen Historical Society. Used here with their permission.

Omer Thomas Lassonde was a talented artist who could paint in any style–realism, cubism, expressionism and abstractism. The categories he painted varied as greatly as his style, and included landscape, still-life, genre, figure painting, and portraiture. “He was a colorist,” his wife, Louisa, said in a 1987 interview. “He used pure, rich colors. He wasn’t afraid of colors. He really wasn’t afraid of anything.” [The Telegraph, Nashua NH, Oct 4, 1987]

Omer was a prolific painter, creating over 2,000 canvasses during his career. His more well-known scenes include New Hampshire, California, Florida, Europe, Samoa and Africa. As one critic stated (1934) “He tries his hand at various idioms and styles and then discards them with equal rapidity to venture in new fields.” [Boston Herald, Boston MA, 7 January 1934] Continue reading