New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Moultonborough

The Moultonborough NH WWI monument sits in front of the Library.

Moultonborough New Hampshire’s WWI monument today sits in front of the Moultonborough Library at 4 Holland Street where it was dedicated on Memorial Day in 1931. Jane Rice of the Historical Society aptly describes the local history of Memorial Day and the exercises that day in Moultonborough NH.  It was not entirely unusual for a New Hampshire town to wait so long to create a monument.  It was a traumatizing time, and funds were lean in the smaller villages.

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THEY GAVE THEIR ALL
MOULTONBOROUGH, NH
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Frank D. Bartlett | Soldier  | Died of Disease (influenza, pneumonia) 6 Oct 1918 NYC |  Co.  C, 9th Infantry / U.S. Merchant Marine | Mason Cemetery, Moultonboro NH | [1]

Leroy E. Dow | Corp. | Died from Wounds Received in Action 13 Sep 1918 | Co. F, 103rd Infantry | Buried Melvin Village Community Church Cemetery, Melvin NH | Also on Center Harbor Memorial, NH Adjutant General credits to Moultonborough NH [2]

Harold E. Glidden | Private | Died of Disease (measles, pneumonia) 23 January 1918 Camp Devens MA | Battery F., 303rd Field Artillery | Mason Cemetery, Moultonborough NH | [3]

Ralph L. Mack* | Private | Died of Disease before 21 Dec 1918, France | Battery B, 46th Artillery CAC | Mason Cemetery, Moultonborough NH | [4]

John H. Moulton | Private | Killed in Action 6 July 1918 | 103rd Infantry Regiment, 26th Division | Aisne-Marne American Cemetery | [5]

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[1] Frank Dudley Bartlett was born 10 May 1895 Moultonboro NH, son of Orville G. & Alice (Leach) Bartlett. He grew up in his native town, attending schools there. When he completed his WWI Registration form on 5 June 1917, he was residing in Moultonboro NH, working as a farmer for his father. He was single and stated he had previously served in the military as a Private for 3 years in the NH National Guard. He was tall, of medium build with blue eyes and brown hair.   During WWI he served in Co. C, 9th Infantry, and was in service at the time of his death on 6 Oct 1918 in New York City, New York or in Richmond NY (two documents state a different place).  His death certificate mentions the Merchant Marine, so possibly he was one of the infantry men assigned to guard merchant marine ships.   His unit, the 9th Infantry Division (“Old Reliables”) was created as the 9th Division during World War I, but never deployed overseas.  He had contracted influenza that lasted 3 days ending in 3 days of pneumonia and his death.   His body was sent home to Moultonborough, where he was buried in Mason Cemetery, Moultonborough NH.  His name is found on NH WWI Honor Roll, Doric Hall, State House, Concord NH.

Photograph of the front line, Bois Brule, Toul front, from Hume, Frank, “History of the 103rd infantry” (1919). World War Regimental Histories. 19.

[2] Leroy E. Dow was born 13 Feb 1893 in Moultonboro NH, son of James B. & Lizzie E. (Garland) Dow. In 1900 living in Moultonboro NH with siblings Etta M., Bernice E., Harry E, Arlene L., Francis P., and Ernest H. His 1917 WWI Registration form showed he was employed stableman for Thomas G. Plant, single, 3 years in NH National Guard. He served initially as a Private, promoted to Corporal, serving in Co. F, 103rd Infantry. He left NYC for Europe on the ship “Saxonia,” on 25 December 1917, his residence then being Center Harbor New Hampshire, and his next of kin, a sister, Mrs. Minot Bickford. He was at first reported that he was wounded severely, and then that he had died from those wounds. Initially buried in France, his remains were returned to the United States, and he is buried in Melvin Village Community Church Cemetery, Melvin NH. His name also appears on the Center Harbor WWI monument, and on the NH WWI Honor Roll, Doric Hall, State House, Concord NH.

[3]  Harold Elmer Glidden was born  14 October 1893 in Moultonborough NH, son of Oscar D. & Eva (Bragg) Glidden, and grandson of Isaac B. & Rhoda J. (Thompson) Glidden.   When he completed his WWI Registration form on 5 June 1917 in Moultonborough NH, he was a farmer working for his father, single, of medium height and build with light blue eyes and light brown hair. Harold E. Glidden died of Disease (measles, pneumonia) on 23 January 1918 at the Base Hospital, Camp Devens MA.  He had been assigned as a Private in Battery F., 303rd Field Artillery. His body was brought home to be buried in Mason Cemetery, Moultonborough NH.  His name appears on the NH WWI Honor Roll, Doric Hall, State House, Concord NH.

[4] Ralph Leonard Mack was b 8 May 1892 in Sandwich NH, son of Fred M. & Nellie E. (Abbott) Mack, and grandson of George & Lois (Chase) Mack. In 1900 he was living in Sandwich NH with his parents, and siblings George F., and Ernest M. Mack. The U.S. Army Transport Service shows him as a private of Battery B, 46th Artillery CAC, with his home town being Center Harbor NH. His mother Nellie Hubbard (his father died in 1908 and his mother remarried). His death notice from disease in France was published in various newspapers on 21 December 1918, so he died prior to that date. Originally buried in Europe, his remains were returned to the United States, where he was buried in Mason Cemetery, Moultonborough NH .  Pvt. Ralph L. Mack is recognized on the Center Harbor NH WWI monument and on the NH WWI Roll of Honor in the NH State House, Concord.

[5] John Henry Moulton was born 9 July 1886 in Lakeport (Laconia) NH, son of Albert & Lizzie B. (Foss) Moulton.  In 1900 at the age of 13 he was living in Moultonborough NH with the Horace A. Smith Family, listed as a “servant.” In 1910 he lived for a while with his grandfather, Nathaniel F. Moulton in Barneston, Gage, Nebraska.  On 5 June 1917 when he completed his WWI Registration form he was living in Moultonborough NH working as a teamster for Lewis Robarge. He was of medium height and build with light brown eyes and light brown hair. During WWI he served as a Private, Company F., 103rd Regiment, 26th Division (Yankee Division).  He was Killed in Action on 6 July 1918 in France. . His heroic remains lie in Plot A Row 3 Grave 60, in the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery .

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QUESTIONABLE SERVICE
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Patrick Cunningham | Private | Died 7 February 1947 Ireland  | Canadian Eng Tr DPO, Canadian Expeditionary Forces in England  | No. 2009946 | Did Not Die during WWI Service.


[Editor’s Note: this story is part of an on-going series about heroic New Hampshire men and women of World War I.  Look here for the entire listing].

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1 Response to New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Moultonborough

  1. Amy says:

    I am still fascinated by the number of those who died in the war from disease as opposed to battle. From your reports, it almost seems like 3:1 or at least 2:1.

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