Tag Archives: native

New Hampshire WWI Military: Private Victor Lemay of Concord NH (1898-1918)

Victor Willie Lemay was born 20 August 1898 in Concord NH, 8th child and son of John & Bridget (Cavanaugh/Kavanagh) Lemay. His father’s occupation on his birth record was painter. His mother was the daughter of Gile Kavanagh. His father, … Continue reading

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New Hampshire’s Signers and the U.S. Constitution–17 September 1787

September 17, 2016 is the 229th anniversary of the signing of the United States Constitution, that occurred on 17 September 1787. This event is completely different than the earlier signing of New Hampshire’s state constitution (established October 31, 1783, that … Continue reading

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New Hampshire’s Missing Heirloom Apples

The conversation had started off innocently enough. I purchased a scabbed and ugly, but still interesting looking apple at the Merrimack Farmer’s Market from Tom Mitchell who runs Ledge Top Farm in Wilton, New Hampshire. His apples are certified naturally … Continue reading

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New Hampshire Glossary: Smallpox

An example of small pox, from book, "The diagnosis of smallpox, "by T.F. Ricketts, 1910

An example of small pox, from book, “The diagnosis of smallpox, “by T.F. Ricketts, 1910

Before the introduction of inoculation, small-pox was the most fatal disease in Great Britain and the American colonies. It killed about one out of four of those who contracted it, and left many survivors blinded, scarred and weak for life. After inoculation became common practice, the disease killed only one in several hundred people.

Eventually as a preventative, and to limit deaths, New Hampshire townships were given the power to isolate individuals and families who had small-pox or those who had come in contact with the disease. These people were placed in pox-houses (or sick-houses). Doing so often reduced the number of people who came in contact with them, and contracted the disease themselves. Continue reading

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New Hampshire’s First Leader, Sagamore of the Penacook, Diplomat and Peacemaker: Passaconaway (c1580-c1673)

Passaconaway was an amazing man. He was Sagamo of the Native People called Penacook.

The Penacook were a confederation of … Continue reading

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