New Hampshire World War I Military: Heroes of Concord

I have probably spent more time writing stories about Concord New Hampshire’s WWI service than any other location in our state. I still have one more to tell.

Here I describe noble but tragic lives–narratives of Concord men and women who “made the ultimate sacrifice,” during World War I. Many of them died from the influenza pandemic that unexpectedly snuffed out the breath of the young and healthy. The research was challenging for me, as the primary evidence of their service does not exist in one place, and was compiled  and woven into a coherent chronicle only with a great, concerted effort. My goal is for the not only the families of these fallen, but complete strangers, to connect with them, feel proud of them, and be grateful and honored by their service as I am.  The WWI Centennial website states that “a man is only missing if he is forgotten.”  Let us not forget.

The two prior articles on this blog about Concord during WWI are “World War I Memorials in Concord” that detail the five local memorial monuments along with their location and inscriptions. The second article, “The Penacook Brigade in World War 1,” was written to honor the men of Penacook, a village in the western part of Concord New Hampshire. My inspiration to write that story was based on a photograph of those brave men provided by Ruth Speed.

Caveat: To write only about the celebrities in service would be an incomplete truth. I honor them all now using the list of names engraved on the Concord monuments as my basis. If you feel I have left someone out, please bring it to my attention so they may be included here. Please NOTE: Due to the great length of this story, those who have already received a separate story will only be linked.

Photograph of Henry A. Coit in uniform. He served during WWI in Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry.

★✫★✫★✫★✪🌟✪✫★✫★✫★★
HEROES OF CONCORD NH
Those who lost their lives during WWI
with a connection to Concord, New Hampshire
★✫★✫★✫★✪🌟✪✫★✫★✫★★

–LEGEND–
The following legend is used to show the source of the name provided on this list. Soldier or nurse is listed on:
[A] WWI Roll of Honor, Doric Hall, State House, Concord NH
[B] Adjutant General’s List of Killed in Action from New Hampshire
[C] Buried in Europe [or MIA], American Battle Monuments Commission
[D] Other Official Military Source
[E] Gold Star Mothers of Massachusetts
[F] U.S. Navy Casualty Books
[G]  Name on Concord NH WWI Memorial, Memorial Field, Concord
[H] Name on Penacook NH WWI Memorial, Penacook
[I] Dedicated Location in Concord NH area (park, monument, etc)
[J] Canadian Military Records
* Photograph or likeness provided or available.
[#] Numbers refer to a footnote following the list with additional information on a particular soldier or sailor.

Thomas H. Abbott |P1C | Killed in Action 5 May 1918 France | 2nd Co., 1st Div. Machine Gun Battalion | Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH |[A][B][G] [1] [Link to Story]

Dante J. Baratelli | Private | Died of Disease (pneumonia) 24 Sep 1918 at sea, en route to France | Battery D, 20th Field Artillery, 5th Division | Body returned to U.S. after War, resting place unknown | [A][D][G][E][2] [Link to Story]

Harry Bassett |Private | Killed in Action 15 October 1918 France | Co. M, 59th Infantry | Woodlawn Cemetery, Nashua NH| Credited to Boscawen NH |[A][B][H] [3]

Sidney W. Beauclerk Jr. |Lieut. | Killed in Action 29 Oct 1918 near Champigneulle France | Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, France |[A][B][C][G] [4] [Link to Story and Photograph]

Robert C. Beckett |Sgt. Major | Died of Disease (pneumonia) 12 Oct 1918, England | Coast Artillery Corps | Calvary Cemetery, Concord NH |[A][G][D] [5] [Link to Story]

Frank Beggs |MM1 (Machine Mate 1C) | Died of Disease (acute pancreatitis) 26 April 1919 US Naval Hospital, Portsmouth VA | U.S. Navy | E. Cambridge MA, unknown cemetery | [A][G][6] [Link to Story]

Herbert H. Bell | Sgt. | Killed in Action 20 July 1918 France | Co C, 103rd Infantry | Highgate Center Cemetery, Highgate Springs VT [A][B][D][G][7]

William M. Bourdeau   | Private | Missing in Action, considered Killed in Action 6 June 1918 Belleau Wood | Co M., 23rd U.S. Regiment | Tablets of the Missing, Aisne-Marne American Cemetery, France | [A][B][C][G][8] [Link to Story and Photograph]

Everett Joseph Bourdon | Private | Killed in Action 5 Oct 1918 France | Co I, 18th Infantry, 1st Div| Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH | Awarded Purple Heart posthumously | Credited to Boscawen NH |[A][B][D][9]

Charles Brooks | Private | Died of Disease (pneumonia) 30 October 1917 France | Co. M, 103rd Infantry | Burial in U.S., location unk |[A][D][G] [10]

David Buchan | Private | Died of heart failure 17 March 1919 Montreal,  Canada  | 42nd Royal Highlanders of Canada | Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH |[G][J] [11]

Richard K. Clarke | Sergeant | Died 23 August 1917 of wounds (poison gas) received at Hill 70 on 18 Aug |1st Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery | Lapugnoy Miitary Cemetery, France| [G][H][J][12]

Henry A. Coit | Private | Died 7 August 1916 from wounds received in accidental injury, Belgium at 3rd Canadian Clearing Station Poperinghe, Belgium| Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) | Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium |[G][J][13]

Richard S. Conover 2d |Corporal |Killed In Action 27 May 1918 near Cantigy NE of Montdidier, France | Machine Gun Co., 18th Regiment | Somme American Cemetery and Memorial, France |[C][D][G] [14]

Paul E. Corriveau, photograph
from 1920 Memorial Yearbook at UNH

Paul E. Corriveau | Lieutenant | Killed in Action 6 Oct 1918 France | USMC, 55th, 5th | Awarded a Silver Star for heroism | Calvary Cemetery, Concord NH |[A][D][G] [15][Link to Story]

Wilfred A.J. Corriveau |– |Died of Disease 19 Apr 1919 (meningitis streptococcus) following surgery at the Mass Eye & Ear Infirmary, Boston MA  | probably served in U.S. Navy | Calvary Cemetery, Concord NH  | [G][16]

John E. Davis | Private | Killed in Accident (explosion) 3 May 1918, Fort Omaha Balloon School, Nebraska | 14th Balloon Company, U.S. Aviation Corps | Maple Grove Cemetery, Concord NH |[A][D][G] [17]

Charles Doyen | Brig. General | Died of Disease (influenza) 6 October 1918, Marine HQ at Quantico VA |  USMC | Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington VA| He commanded the first detachment of Marines to land in France during WWI | Recipient of the first Navy Distinguished Service Medal (posthumously) |[A][D][G] [18] [Link to Story and Photographs] Originally a park in Concord NH was dedicated to him, but over time the land has been turned into a parking lot until the park no longer exists (used to be at the corners of Court and Montgomery Street). Thankfully the monument itself was recently moved to the southeast corner of the old Merrimack County Court House building in the same vicinity.

Herbert C. Drew | Private | Died of Disease 6 October 1918 France |Company M, 309th Infantry | Maple Grove Cemetery, Concord NH |[A][D][G][19]

Walter T. Drew | Wagoner | Died of Disease (nephritis, broncho-pneumonia 8 March 1919 France | 303rd Ammunition Train, 78th Div. | Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH |[A][D][G] [20] [Link to Story and Photographs]

Irving J. Farley  | Private | Died of Wounds 14 Sept 1918 France | Co C, 103rd Infantry | Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH |[A][B][G] [21]

Graduation photograph of Lucy Nettie Fletcher from her 1910 Radcliffe College yearbook.

Lucy N. Fletcher | Red Cross Nurse | Died of Disease (cerebo-spinal meningitis) 6 May 1918 Bordeau, France | U.S. Army Hospital No. 6, Bordeau France | Suresnes American Cemetery, France | [A][C][G][I] [22][Link to Story and Photographs]

Joseph N. Guyette | Private | Killed in Action 16 June 1918 Battle of Xivray, France | Calvary Cemetery, Penacook NH | [A[B][G][H][I] [23][Link to Story and Photographs]

Woodbury Davis Hagan | Corporal | Died of Disease 24 Sep 1918 France | 120th Aero Squadron | Alexander Cemetery, Bow Junction NH |[A][D] [48]

Clarence A. Hanlon | Sergt. | Killed in Action 10 October 1918 France | Co C., 1st Depot Bn, 1st Quebec Regiment | Eterpigny British Cemetery, France |[G][J] [24]

Roy S. Holland | Private | Died of Disease 26 September 1918, Base Hospital, Camp Devens, Harvard MA | A Co., 74th Infantry | Woodlawn Cemetery, Penacook NH | [25]

Allen Hollis, Jr. | Corporal | Died of Disease (Influenza complicated by double broncho-pneumonia, pericarditis and endocarditis) 19 December 1918, Stillman Infirmary, Cambridge MA | S.A.T.C. Harvard Unit | Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH |[A][D][G] [26]

Henry F. Hollis Jr.  | Lieut. | Died 4 Sep 1918 in Dayton, Ohio | Army Aviation Corps | Nassau Presbyterian Cemetery, Princeton NJ | [D][G] [27]

Harry Lambrukos | Private | Died of Disease 3 Feb 1919  | Co. F, Postal Express, U.S. Army | Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington VA | [A][D][G][H] [28] [See Story and Photographs]

Ernest A. LaPlante  | Private | Died of Disease (pneumonia due to influenza ) 30 Sep 1918 Yaphank, LI, New York | Camp Upton | Mount Calvary Cemetery, Manchester NH | [29]

Victor W. Lemay   | Private | Died of Wounds 17 July 1918, France | 103rd Infantry, 26th Div. | Aisne-Marne American Cemetery, Belleau, France. |[A][B][C][G] [30] [See Story and Photographs]

John P. Mannion | P1C | Died of Disease, 23 Feb 1919, England | Field Hospital Co #161, 116th Sanitary Train, U.S. Army | Calvary Cemetery, Concord NH | [A][G] [31]

John T. Martin | Soldier | Died 2 Mar 1918 Manhattan NY | U.S. Army, Fort Slocum | Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH |[A][D][G] [32]

George E. Matson | Private | Died of Disease (acute tuberculosis) 18 February 1918,  | U.S. Army, Fort Oglethorpe, GA | Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH |[A][D][G] [33]

Ernest Matthews  | Private | Killed in Action 11 January 1916 Belgium |42nd Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada) Canadian Expeditionary Forces | R.E. Farm Cemetery, Heuvelland, Belgium |[G][J] [34]

Charles J. McDonald | Sergeant | Died of Disease (tuberculosis) 27 Jan 1919 France | Battery E, 115th F.A.| Calvary Cemetery,  Concord NH |[A][D][G] [35]

Harold W. McNeil | Seaman 2c | Died of Disease (lobar pneumonia) 14 April 1918  First Naval District, Boston, MA | United States Naval Reserve Force | Woodlawn Cemetery, Concord NH |[F][G][36]

Charles H. Moberg Jr.  | Corporal | Killed in Action 1 November 1918 in the Grand Pre Offensive | Co. M, 309th, Infantry, 78th Div. | Buried Concord NH, unk cemetery |[A][B][C][37]

Theresa [Teresa] Murphy  | Nurse | Died of Disease (pulmonary tuberculosis) 9 November 1918 HQ Base Section #3 S.O.S., A.E.F near London England | Brookwood American Military Cemetery, England | Red Cross/U.S. Army |[A][C][G][H][I][38] [See Story and Photographs]

Frank Opie | Private | Died of Wounds 12 April 1918 France |Co. E, 14th Engineers (Railway) | Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH | Credited to Boston MA |[D][E][G] [39]

Harold R. Rogers | Soldier | Died of Disease (pneumonia & influenza) 13 October 1918 Essex, Vermont | Fort Ethan Allen, Vermont | Wildwood Cemetery, Chittenden VT |[A][G] [40]

Joseph “Joe” Sanel  | Private | Killed in Action 2 Nov 1918 France | Co B, 148th Infantry | Hebrew Cemetery, Manchester NH | [A][B][G] [41] [Special Circumstances, see notes]

Arthur O. Thompson  | Captain | Killed in Action 29 Sep 1918 | 72nd Battalion, 11th Canadian Mounted Rifles| Sancourt British Cemetery, France | [D][G][J][42]

Raymond W. Thompson  | 2d Lieutenant | Died of Disease 13 Sep 1918 ( of “Spanish” Influenza), Lancaster Hospital, Corey Hill, Brookline MA. | Quartermaster Corps, U.S. Army | Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH |[A][D][G] [43]

Harry H. Turcotte  |P1c | Died of Wounds received in action 3 Nov 1918, France | Co B, 148th Infantry | Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH  | [44]

Ralph A. Turgeon  | Corporal | Died of Disease 18 November 1918 | Co. C, 103rd Infantry | Sacred Heart Cemetery, Laconia NH| [45] [See Story and Photographs]

Carl V. Whidden | Wagoner | Died of Wounds 27 Oct 1918, Cunel France | Battery C,  146 Field Artillery | Buried U.S.A., unknown location | [D][G] [46]

Chester W. Woods | — | Died of Disease (grippe, broncho-pneumonia) 1 Oct 1918 Hitchcock Hospital, Hanover NH | probably Dartmouth College Training Cantonment |Summer Street Cemetery Lancaster NH  | [A][49]

Leslie G. Whiteman  | Private | Missing, declared Killed in Action 17 July 1918 Argonne, France | Co. E, 103d Infantry 26th Div.  | Tablets of the Missing, Aisne-Marne American Cemetery, France |  [47]

★✫★✫★✫★✪🌟✪✫★✫★✫★★
DETAILS / B I O G R A P H Y
★✫★✫★✫★✪🌟✪✫★✫★✫★★

[1] Thomas Harold Whitcomb Abbott, son of Francis U. & Alice A. (Toof) Abbott. [Link to Story]
[2] Dante Joseph Baratelli, son of Angelo & Elisa (Airoli) Baratelli. [Link to Story and Photo].
[3] Harry Emory Bassett son of Moise Emory “Moses” & Amelia (Carpenter) Bassett, was born 19 June 1891 in Boscawen NH [per birth certificate, his WWI registration states 1892]. In 1900 he was living in Boscawen NH with his family, and by 1910 had removed with them to Concord Ward I.  His siblings include Zoe Mary (who m1 Frank Gilman Long and m2 Marion S. Hamilton), Arthur William, Arnold R., May E., and Walter E.  Harry E. Bassett completed his WWI Registration form in Boscawen NH giving his birth year as 1892. He was occupied as a painter for Billsborough Brothers of Concord NH. He stated he was single and the support of his mother and a brother. He was of medium height, was slender with grey eyes and light hair. His descriptions notes that he is missing portions of four fingers.  During WWI he was sent to Europe as U.S. Military Transport Passenger lists show that Private Harry E. Bassett of Company M, 59th Infantry was aboard the ship Olympic on 5 May 1918 departing New York City.  The NH Adjutant Generals List of Casualties officially lists Harry’s death as occurring on 15 October 1918. There was some confusion, however for the newspapers of the day show him preoted “Wounded” on 10 Dec 1918 [Boston Globe] follow by Missing in Action on  3 Feb 1919, and finally “Died, Previously reported MIA” on 10 June 1919.  When the war ended, his body was returned to the United States and buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Nashua NH.  His service is credited to Boscawen NH.  His name is engraved on the Honor Roll in Doric Hall of the NH State House, and on the Penacook WWI monument.
[4]  Sidney W. Beauclerk Jr. , son of William Preston & Jennie M. (Hayward) Beauclerk.  [Link to Story and Photo].
[5] Robert Clinton Beckett, son of John E. & Elizabeth C. (Clinton) Beckett.   [Link to Story]
[6] Francis “Frank” Beggs, son of Irish immigrants Michael Begg & Ann Farley. [Link to Story]
[7] Herbert H. Bell, son of Peter Jonah & Sophia (Lafountain) Bell was born 5 May

Burlington Free Press newspaper story on return of Herbert Bell’s body to the United States. Dated 6 September 1921.

1887 Ellensburg, Clinton Co. NY. His father died in 1891 when he was about 3 years old leaving a widow and several young children.  She married 2d) into the Rollo family, first John then Henry and lived in Ellensburg NY and Highgate Vermont.  Herbert Bell moved with her until he reached adulthood.  He had siblings (surname Bell) Irving, Ella Mary, Augustus, Frederick “Fred,” William, Herbert H., and Charles A.  The U.S. Adjutant General Military Records 1631-1976, VERMONT show the following: BELL, Herbert H.
Res. Highgate Spgs. Official Record: Concord N.H. Born at Ellensburgh, N.Y. Enl: Feb 10, 1914 Concord, N.H. (27 yrs old). Org: Co. “C” 1st N.H. Inf. (Co. “C” 103rd Inf) to July 20, 1918. Grades Sgt. Aug 1, 1916; Cpl. July 1, 1916.  Overseas: Sept 27, 1917 to July 20, 1918 Killed in Action: July 20, 1918. Pl. of burial: Highgate Spgs.”   Two newspaper clippings offer additional information: The Barre Daily Times, Barre Vermont, 8 Aug 1918, page 4. “Sergt. Herbert H. Bel of Highgate, who was killed in France recently, was a non-commissioned officer with a Concord company of the New Hampshire National Guard at the time the war broken out and one of the first Americans to go across. A brother, Private Arthur Rollo, is a member of the 103d machine gun battalion in France and their mother, Mrs. Henry Rollo, lives in Highgate Springs.” // Burlington Free Press 6 Sep 1921–SWANTON. “Herbert H. Bell, who was killed in France on July 20, 1918, was brought to Highgate Springs, Thursday. The funeral services were held from the Congregational Church at Highgate Center Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock the Rev F. Wilson Day officiating.”  The final resting place of Sergt. Herbert H. Bell is Highgate Center Cemetery, Highgate Springs VT.  His name appears on the NH Adjutant General’s List of Casualties, on the Honor Roll in Doric Hall of the NH State House, and on the Concord City WWI memorial.
[8] William Moses Bourdeau, son of Frank & Josephine (Gothier) Bourdeau. [Link to Story and Photograph]
[9] Everett Joseph Bourdon was born 12 Oct 1895 in Loudon NH, son of James & Flora (Couture/Sawyer) Bourdon. He had siblings Rosa A. (who m. William B. Clark), Walter James (who m. Vina Mildred Brown)., Jennie E. (who m. John F. Leaver), Michael James “Mack”, and Edna Phillis. He completed his WWI Registration form on 5 June 1918 from Northwood, Rockingham Co. NH where he was living, working in lumbering for Walter J. Bourdon of Northwood. He

First Division soldiers during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive.

was the support of his mother. He describes himself as being short, of medium build with blue eyes and brown hair.  He was already serving in Europe by 24 July 1918 when the U.S. Military Transport Passenger lists show him as a member of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 303rd Infantry departing from Winnall Down Camp on that date aboard the ship Caesarea probably bound for France. [Winnall Down Camp was an American Rest Camp near Winchester, England.]  There are several documents that tell the rest of Everett J. Bourdon’s story–one is his reburial document from the State of New Hampshire and the second is his U.S. Military Grave Marker Request Card.  Both documents verify that Private Everett J. Bourdon was killed in action in France on 5 Oct 1918, while serving in Co I, 18th Infantry, 1st Division probably during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive (see silent film).  He was at first buried in France in a military graveyard where he died. When the war ended his family requested the return of his body to U.S. soil.  He was reburied in Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord NH on on 11 Sep 1921. The NH Adjutant General’s WWI Casualty List credits his service to Boscawen NH. He is recognized on the NH WWI Honor Roll in Doric Hall of the NH State House. His military headstone records state that he was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.
[10] Charles Horatio Brooks was born 26 April 1895 in New Boston NH, son of Lewis F. & Alma Ann (Johnson) Brooks. His mother died in 1900 when he was 5 years old. He had siblings George Edward (who m. Florence M. Rice), Valma A. (who m. Amos R. Roberts).  He completed his WWI Draft Registration form on 5 June 1917 at age 22 while living at 66 Bridge St. Concord NH. At that time he was self-employed as a farmer.  He describes himself as single, of medium height and build, with brown eyes and brown hair.  He enlisted 8 Aug 1917 and served in

Brooklyn Daily Eagle newspaper notice of January 11 1918 re death of Brooks.

Co M, 103rd Infantry (a local Concord area troop).  On 27 Sep 1917 he departed the U.S. for Europe aboard the ship Lapland.  A little over a month later on 30 October 1917 he was dead of disease, specifically pneumonia (probably a result of influenza). He probably had not seen military action in Europe as their first months were busy with training and preparation.  There is some confusion in several publications of his year of death, however reports of his death first appear in January of 1918 which would indicate that his October 30th death happened in 1917 not 1918.  When the war ended his body was returned to the U.S. as is evidenced by a listing in the Military Transport Lists of 1 May 1921 when his remains left Cherbourg France en route to Hoboken New Jersey. The cemetery of his reburial is unknown.  His name is engraved on the NH WWI Honor Roll in the NH State House, and on the WWI Honor Roll in Concord New Hampshire.
[11] David Buchan was born 30 May 1891 at Buckie, Banffshire, Scotland, son of Robert F. & Sarah Ann (Rennie) Buchan. He immigrated with his family around 1906 to the United States and by 1910 they had settled in Concord New Hampshire.  David completed his Canadian Attestation paper on Aug 28, 1916 stating he was aged 25 years 2 months, occupation baker, stood 5 ft 3-1/2 inches tall, had a dark complexion, blue eyes and  black hair.  His siblings included Robert, William, Alex R., Marion R., Francis, Lizzie R. [Elizabeth Robinson who m. Clarence Grover Howser], Sarah A., James Falconer, and Charles H. (possibly others). Among his Canadian records is this following document: RECORD OF SERVICE. 5 Feb 1925. This is to certify that No. 228871. Private BUCHAN, David. enlisted in the 5th Royal Highlanders of Canada. (Tran to 42nd Infantry Battn) Canadian Expeditionary Force at Montreal, P.Q. on the 28th day of August 1916; served in CANADA ENGLAND FRANCE & BELGIUM; was returned to Canada and struck off strength at Montreal P.Q. on the 16th day of March 1919, in consequence of being DECEASED. Wounded G.S.W. right Arm 30-9-18. [G.S.W. = gun shot wound]. G.H. Brown for Colonel, Director of Records.   Additional records show that he arrived in England for service on 30 December 1916, and after serving for more than 2 years in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces, he was wounded in the field on 30 September 1918 and returned to Halifax, Canada aboard the ship, Megantic on 5 March 1919. Twelve days later he was found to have died of heart failure in a temperance hotel on Windsor Street in Montreal, Canada.[Note: After I had researched this story on my own I ran across this wonderful story by Nick Metcalfe on the same man with photographs so I include a link to it here].  David Buchan’s name can be found only on the City of Concord WWI monument at Memorial Field.  He is buried in Concord NH at Blossom Hill Cemetery near the grave of his mother.
[12] Richard Kingston Clarke was born 3 September 1894 in Quincy MA,
son of Richard W. & Ella M. (Slack) Clarke.   His father had immigrated from Ireland about 1891 and by 1895 had settled in Concord NH where he worked as a  stone or granite cutter. Richard K. Clarke was the oldest child, and had siblings Maxwell Gordon (who also enlisted in the Canadian AEF), and Lila Blanche (who married Harry Jameson), Robert Albert (who married Grace Louise Hirth), Florence Savella (who married Nelson Amos Merchant), Margaret R. (who d. in 1990), and Irena E.  Before I begin this narrative I must share with my readers that a certain number of Americans wanted to fight in the World War in a Canadian Regiment Canada, either to participate before the United States entered the war or because they were refused enlistment in the U.S.  Whatever Richard K. Clarke’s reasons, this is what he indeed did.

Photograph of “Wounded receiving initial care in trench prior to evacuation rearward.” Royal Canadian Medical Service Association.

The information he provided as his birth place and date were not true, and I am certain this is the same man described. On his Canadian Attestation Papers of 20 Sep 1914 he claimed to have been born 3rd Sept 1892 in Truro N.S. [He did not have his birth papers in hand and it is noted they were being sent for]. At this time he was noted as aged 22, 5ft 10 inches tall, with fair complexion, hazel eyes and dk brown hair.  His will bequeathed his estate in case of death to  his mother Mrs. R.W. Clarke 126 N. Main Street Penacook NH.  His CEF participation is detailed as follows: “Regt No 40625 Rank: Cpl (Corporal), 3rd Battery 1st Artillery Bde CEF.  Embarked for Europe 2 March 1915. On 7 August 1915 promoted to Corporal. On 7 Oct 1916 he was admitted to the No. 7 Co Dep. Station at Boulogne for slight wound to the back, discharged 24 Oct 1916 (18 days) then to No. 2 Oarge rest camp for 15 days then sent to rejoin his unit. On 10 Dec 1916 promoted to Sergeant.  On 18 August 1917 Admitted to Casual Clearing Station (field hospital) after the effects of gas poisoning in the field.  Died of Wounds 23 August 1917 at No 18 Casual Clearing Station. Amended record: Died from the effects of gas poisoning in the field (France or Belgium).  He is buried in Lapugnoy Miitary Cemetery, France.  His family placed a cenotaph in the Clarke family plot, Maple Grove Cemetery, Concord NH.  His name is recognized on the Concord NH WWI monument in Memorial Park, and on the American Legion Post #31 in Penacook NH (as Richard Clark).
[13] Henry Augustus Coit was born 25 May 1888 in Concord NH, son of Joseph Howland & Adeline (Balch) Coit, and grandson of Rev. Henry Augustus Coit first rector of St. Paul’s School in Concord NH.    He completed Canadian Army Attestation papers on 17 Dec 1915, enlisting in service. At that time he had a height of 6-1-1/2 inches, weighed 170 lbs, had fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair.  He was assigned to the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment). His official military papers show that he arrived in England on S.S. Olympic  on 13 April

Henry Augustus Coit, number 487429, private in Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, 1916; Harvard Library.

1916. Two months later, on 7 June 1916, he was injured and sent to No. 3 Casual Clearing Station. Additional documents show that he was accidentally struck by a motorized lorry (truck) resulting in compound fractures of both legs at the knee.  On 19 of July 1916 he was declared dangerously ill. He appeared at times to be rallying but he died of “wounds, laceration of both knees” on 9 August 1916 at No. 3 Casual Clearing Station, Poperinghe Belgium. Various communications from a privately published booklet show that his parents sailed for Europe and landed in England but were not allowed to visit him near the battlefield. He was originally laid to rest in Sheet 27, L-22, D-63 on the Poperinge Boeschepe road, marked with a cross.  His final resting place is Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium.  Several newspapers of the time carries stories about his death, not all entirely accurate.  [From Boston Post] HENRY A COIT, HARVARD ’08 IS VICTIM OF WAR. NEW YORK, Aug 9.–A Cable dispatch received here announced the death on Monday, August 7, in France of Henry Augustus Coit of New York, who was serving at the front with the British Army. Mr. Coit was the son of Joseph Howland Coit, president of Moffatt, Yard & Co. and chairman of the board of trustees of the American Defense Society of this city, and Adeline Balch Coit, and the grandson of Rev Henry August Coit, first rector of St. Paul’s School, Concord NH. Henry August Coit, the second, who was in his 27th year was educated at St. Paul’s School and entered Harvard University in 1908. He left the University to enter the employ of the Long Island Railroad. In December 1915 Mr. Coit went to Canada and enlisted in the Princess Patricia’s Regiment, Canadian Volunteers. His regiment reached  the front late in June. On July 7 his father received a cable dispatch saying Coit had been injured in both legs and that his condition was grave. On July 29 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Howland [Coit] sailed for France and arrived just in time to see their son before he died.”  Henry Augustus Coit’s service is recognized in Concord NH, on the WWI memorial in Memorial Park.

Richard Stevens Conover, ca. 1917-1925, chalk on paper
mounted on paperboard, by John Elliott. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Maud Howe Elliott, 1927.8.19

[14] Richard Stevens Conover 2d was born 18 March 1898 in Concord NH, son of Rev. James Potter & Mary Bowman (Coit) Conover, and grandson of Rev. Dr. Henry Coit of St. Paul’s School.  Richard’s father was Rector of St. Paul’s School in Concord NH from 1922-1931. Richard was also cousin to Henry Augustus Coit (see previous entry). He had siblings James R. Jr., (who married Maria de la Luz Lazo and died in 1981 in Mexico), Mary Bowman (who married Herbert Henriques), and Eleanor Stewart (who married Chauncey H. Beasley). Richard S. Conover 2d began his work in American Field Service on 5 May 1917 in the transport section 526 until Nov 8, 1917. [American Field Service was composed of mostly Americans as “Friends of France,” who committed a certain length of time during WWI to non-military service. Many of them worked with the ambulance crews.] While in Europe, Richard S. Conover enlisted in U.S. Army, and was assigned to Machine Gun Co., 18th Regiment, at Goedrecourt France.  He was killed in action six months later, on 27 May 1918, near Cantigy northeast of Montdidier, France.  For his service he received two American citations.  The book, Memorial Volume of the American Field Service in France, “Friends of France”, 1914-1917 by James W.D. Seymour, 1921 goes into detail of Richard’s service. This book states that Richard “was within two months of graduating from St. Paul’s School, Concord, NH when the opportunity came for him to join the American Field Service. Incensed over the death of his favorite cousin, a member of the Princess Pat Regiment, then in Belgium, he promptly accepted and, at the age of nineteen, sailed for France. Being unusually big and strong, he was chosen for the camion [truck] service, and drove a truck for six months on the Asine front…..” Corporal Conover was assisting in killing German soldiers in order to rescue two of their captured infantrymen, when he was hit and died in the trenches on 27 May 1918. Corporal Richard Stevens Conover 2nd is buried at Somme American Cemetery and Memorial in France.  His name is engraved on the Concord WWI monument at Memorial Field.
[15] Paul Edward Corriveau, son of Paul & Sarah (Patoine) Corriveau, brother of #16 (see). [Link to Story]
[16] Wilfred Alfred Joseph Corriveau was born 12 Oct 1898 in Concord, NH son of Paul & Sarah (Patoine) Corriveau, brother to #15 (above).  He grew up on Carter Street in Concord NH and had siblings Eugene, Joseph, Peter, Paul (who died in WWI), Albert, Aimee, Rose, Alice, Louis and Evangline. On 5 June 1917 he completed his WWI Registration form in Concord NH. as Wilford Alfred Joseph Corriveau. At that time living at 27 Carter Street, aged 19. He was working as a signalman for the B&M Railroad. He was single his parents his nearest relatives at the same address.  He described himself as tall 5-4 with hazel eyes and black hair.  I cannot find any evidence that he served in the army, however there was a notice in the newspaper: on 26 March 1917 The Boston Globe shows recent enlistments in the Navy at South Boston MA, one name being Wilfred A.J. Corriveau, 27 Carter Street, Concord N.H., baker, 18.  The records of his death do not state that he was then in any branch of the armed services. He had an operation at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary for mastoiditis and this resulted in meningitis streptococcus. He died from this on 19 April 1919 in the Boston MA infirmary.  He was buried in the family plot in Calvary Cemetery, Concord NH. He was 20 years and 6 months old.

Balloon House at Fort Omaha, A hot air balloon hovers in the air over the hangar. 1900-1910. From the collections of the Omaha Public Library.

[17] John Elro Davis was born [Elro John Davis] on 7 Jan 1899 in Hillsborough, Hillsborough Co. NH, son and third child of Arthur Wilson & Cora Belle (Flanders) Davis.  By 1910 he was living with his family on North State Street in Concord, NH.  His siblings included Frances Myrtle who m. Frithjof L. Wilhelmsen, Errol Arthur who m. Florence Mary Prescott, Cora Eleanor who m. Harold Robert Colby, Ida Marion and Jennie Sophronia who m. Harold Eugene Jennings. A newspaper notice shows that he was serving as a Private in the 14th Balloon Company at Camp Omaha, in Nebraska.  CAPTIVE BALLOON BURSTS, KILLING TWO. Omaha, Neb.,

Argus Leader, Sioux Falls SD of 3 May 1918 explosion notice

May 3–Two members of the 14th Balloon Company were burned to death and 20 others slightly burned last night when a big observation balloon exploded in its hangar on Florence Field, it was determined today. The dead are: Private John E. Davis and Private Vincent Beall. Two other soldiers were injured when the ambulance in which they were rushing from Fort Omaha to Florence Field collided with another car. The explosion of the balloon is believed to have been caused by static electricity generated by friction while the balloon was being put into its hangar. /continued / Two soldiers were burned to death and eighteen men were burned seriously when a captive observation balloon of the Cacquot type exploded last night at Florence field, the army balloon school at Fort Omaha near here, according to a statement by Col. H.B. Hersey, post commander….”Two men are killed, burned so as to be unrecognizable, and a roll call in the morning will be necessary before it is possible to establish their identity beyond question. Eighteen men were more or less injured in the blast and a few quite seriously but not fatally. The men burned received immediate medical attention by surgeons at the fort hospital.” Last nights fatalities were the first since the balloon school opened several months ago. He was buried in Maple Grove Cemetery, Concord NH.  His name is engraved on the WWI Roll of Honor in the NH State House, and on the City of Concord WWI monument at Memorial Field.
[18] Brigadier General Charles Augustus Doyen, son of  Edward Nevins & Mary Elizabeth “Molly” (Tucker) Doyen.  [Link to Story and Photographs].
[19] Herbert Cumings Drew was born  7 September 1889 in Concord NH, son of William A. & Mary Alice “Minnie” (Spead) Drew. He grew up on Albin Street in Concord NH and attended the local schools.  He had siblings William Farnham (who died

Ceremonies held in a Hoboken pier for the war dead in flag-draped caskets, Hoboken, 1921. Hoboken Historical Museum.

in 1913), Margaret Catherine and Leonard Spead (who married Hazel Blanchard).   On 5 June 1917 he completed his WWI registration form stating his birth year one year earlier in 1889. He was living at 5 Albin Street in Concord with his family, occupation painter. He was single, of medium height and medium build with gray eyes and brown hair.  The U.S. Military Transport Passenger List shows that he was a Private in Company M, 309th Infantry on 19 May 1918 aboard the ship Menior when it departed Brooklyn NY for Europe. His service number was 1748643.  He died 5 months later of disease, possibly influenza which was pandemic among the troops at this time.  He would have been buried near the hospital in France where he died, but when the war ended his family requested his return.  On 26 April 1921 he was among those heroes returned to the United States in a casket, arriving at Hoboken NJ. He was buried in his family’s plot in Maple Grove Cemetery, Concord NH.  His name is engraved on the WWI Honor Roll in Doric Hall of the NH State House, and on the WWI Honor Plaque at Concord NH’s Memorial Field.
[20] Walter Thompson Drew son of Emery Moore & Carrie E. (Thompson) Drew. [Link to Story and Photographs]
[21] Irving J. Farley  was born 24 July 1897 in Loudon NH, son of James & Agnes (Lamprone) Farley.  He grew up and attended the local schools in Loudon where he is found in the 1900 and 1910 U.S. Census records with his family. He had one sibling, Edith May Farley who married 3 Jan 1920 in Bangor Maine to John H. O’Hearn. She lived in Quincy MA and had children John, James, Marjorie and Eileen. In the 1917 Concord City Directory Irving Farley is working as a foreman in Concord, and has a house in Suncook NH.  The U.S. Military Transport Passenger List shows that on 27 September 1917 Irving J. Farley was among those on the ship Celtic who departed New York City for Europe. He was a Private in Co. C, 103rd Infantry, listing his home as Hancock Vermont.  While serving in France he died of wounds received in action on 14 September 1918. The NH Adjutant General Casualty List credits him to Concord NH.  When the war ended his family requested the return of his body and he was brought home aboard the ship, Wheaton in April of 1921. He was buried with honors in Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH. US Adjutant General Military Records 1631-1976 Roster of Vermont Men and Women in the World War show: *FARLEY, IRVING J. 67,451.  Res: Hancock. Official Record: Concord, N.H. Born at Loudon, N.H. Enl. July 17, 1917 Concord N.H. 20 yrs. Org: Co. “C,” 1st N.H. Inf. (Co. “C,” 103d Inf) to Sept 14, 1918 Overseas: Sept 27, 1917 to Sept 14, 1918 Died of Wounds: Sept 14, 1918 Pl. of Burial: Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord N.H.  Irving J. Farley’s name appears on the WWI Honor Roll in Doric Hall of the New Hampshire State House, and on the City of Concord WWI monument at Memorial Field.
[22]  Lucy Nettie Fletcher, daughter of Charles George Ellis & Antoinette “Nettie” Murdock (Binet) Fletcher [See Story and Photographs]
[23] Joseph N. Guyette, son of Felix & Matilda (Durgin) Guyette [See Story and Photographs].

Signature on U.S. Registration

[24]  Clarence Augustine Hanlon was born 28 May 1896 in Concord NH,
son of John F. & Annie D. (Hickey) Hanlon. He grew up in Concord NH and lived there until 1910 when his widowed father moved to Medford MA.  Clarence had siblings George Wilfred (who d. 1969 Cambridge MA), Alfred J. (he married Margaret E. Muldoon and d. Feb 1968 in Florida), John Bernard who married May Kimball and d. 1922, buried Brookline MA, Anna/Annie Ethel (who married Harry Oscar Weber), Francis Edward “Frank” (who died on 1977 a WWI vet), and Paul Lawrence who served in 60th Company USMC. On 5 June 1918 Clarence

Hanlon will from Canadian records.

completed his U.S. WWI Draft Registration Card from Boston MA. He was 21 years old working in Boston MA at the United States Hotel as a cigar clerk. He was single and described himself as being of medium height and build with blue eyes and dark brown hair. Four months later he completed attestation papers for Canadian Army enlistment (providing some untruthful information in order to enlist).  At that time he describes himself as being 5ft 3 inches tall, light complexion with light blue eyes and dark brown hair. He was declared fit to serve.  He was assigned to Co. C of the 1st Depot Bn (1st Quebec Regiment) and sailed for Europe on the RMS Saxonia from Halifax on 18 Feb 1918. He was transferred to the 23rd Canadian Regiment. on 3 May 1918 he was promoted to Sergent.  Canadian records state he was Killed in Action on 10 October 1918.  He was buried at Eterpigny British Cemetery in France [his monument shows “Private” rather than Sergeant].   The 27 Oct 1918 edition of the Boston Post tells this story: “Private Clarence A. Hanlon of West Roxbury, after being rejected in the draft, enlisted in the 13th Battalion, R.H.C. last February, and was killed in action Oct 10, according to a telegram received by his father, John F. Hanlon from the Canadian government. Before enlisting he had charge of the newsstand at the United States Hotel of this city. Besides his parents he leaves a sister and five brothers.” Clarence A. Hanlon’s service is recognized also with his name inscribed on the Concord NH WWI monument in Memorial Park.
[25] Roy Scott Holland was born 3 February 1895 in Andover NH, son of William Scott & Carrie Mary (Grace) Holland.  By 1910 he was living with his family in Concord NH where he attended school.  Roy had siblings Jean Robert (d. 13 Oct 1918 in Penacook of influenza), Maurice Mavens (d. 9 Oct 1918 in Penacook NH of influenza), Florence Ella (who m. Ralph William Spofford), Doris Carrie (who m. Hiram O. Mitchell), and Ralph William (who m. Goldie Malvina Auprey, d. 1990).  On 5 June 1917 he completed his WWI Registration form. He was 23 years old, living in Concord NH working as a track-man for the B&M Electric Railway of Concord. He was single, of medium height and build with gray eyes and dark brown hair.  New Hampshire Death and Disinterment Records for Roy S. Holland show that he died 26 Sep 1918, aged 23 at the Base Hospital of Camp Devens MA. He probably was assigned there for training during the influenza pandemic.  He was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Penacook (Concord) New Hampshire on 30 Sep 1918. His service is recognized on the WWI Honor Roll in the New Hampshire State House, and on the Concord City WWI monument in Memorial Park.

Photograph of Allen Hollis, Jr. Harvard Memorial Society. Roll of Honor photographs. HUD 3567.219.2 No.283. Harvard University Archives. Used with permission.

[26] Allen Hollis, Jr. was born 1 Feb 1900 in Concord NH, son of Allen & Amoret (Nichoson) Hollis. Allen Sr. was a lawyer.   In 1910 Allen Hollis Jr. was living with his family in Concord NH where he attended the local schools. He had one sibling, Franklin Hollis (b 1904, d. 1980 who married Eleanor A. Slaker).  The Boston Globe of 19 Dec 1918 page 5 printed the following story: “CORP ALLEN HOLLIS JR. DIES AT CAMBRIDGE. Corp Allen Hollis Jr., oldest son of Hon and Mrs. Ernest Hollis of Concord, N H died at Cambridge yesterday of pneumonia, following an attack of influenza contracted while in the performance of his duties as corporal in the S.A.T.C. at Harvard University. He was born Feb 1 1900 and was prepared in the Concord schools and in Phillips Exeter Academy, from which he was graduated with high honors in the class of ’17. He entered Harvard in the class of 1921, became a member o the R.O.T.C. and upon his return to college last September, was enrolled in the S.A.T.C., being soon after advanced to the rank of corporal. Corp Hollis’ father is a lawyer of wide reputation, a director of the Federal Reserve Bank in the Boston district and a director of War Savings for New Hampshire.”  Allen Hollis Jr. died on 18 Dec 1918 at Cambridge MA, in Stillman Infirmary (at Harvard) on Mt. Auburn Street. He was 17 years 10 months and 17 days old.  His  disinterment record states the cause of death as “Influenza complicated by double broncho pneumonia, periocarditis and endocarditis.”  He was buried at Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord NH on 20 Dec 1918. His name is engraved on the WWI Roll of Honor in the New Hampshire State House, and on the City of Concord WWI monument in Memorial Field.

Henry French Hollis Jr. from the 1919 Cornell Yearbook

[27] Henry F. Hollis Jr.  was born 26 May 1894 at Concord NH, son of Henry F. & Grace B. (Fisher) Hollis Sr.  Henry F. Hollis Sr. was a State Senator from New Hampshire.  The Cornell Alumni News, Vol 21, Cornell University, 1919, page 184 provides the best biography of  Henry F. Hollis Jr. ’17. “Lieutenant Henry French Hollis Jr., died suddenly at Dayton Ohio on September 4, 1918. Hollis was born on May 26, 1894 and was the son of Senator and Mrs. Henry F. Hollis of Concord N.H. He prepared at Phillips Exeter Academy and Sturgis School, and entered Cornell in 1913, receiving the degree of A.B. in 1917. He was a member of Theta Delta Chi and the Phillips Club and in his junior and senior years was a member of the Freshman Advisory Committee. He received his commission in the Air Service, and was stationed at Wilbur Wright Field, near Dayton, Ohio.”  According to his death certificate he died of a gunshot wound, a suicide at Gibbons Hotel in Dayton, Ohio.   The Evening Star, Washington DC 7 Sep 1918, page 2 reported: “Lieut. Henry F. Hollis of the Army Aviation Corps committed suicide by shooting himself while in a hotel Wednesday in Dayton, Ohio where he was stationed. It has developed he was a son of Senator Henry F. Hollis of New Hampshire. Lieut. Hollis, who was twenty-three years of age, was formerly a student at Cornell University and lived with his mother in Princeton, N.J. before entering the military service. Senator Hollis is now on his way to France to visit the battle lines, but at his office no explanation to show any reason for the act could be obtained. It was said, however, that while in training shortly before receiving his commission, six months ago, Lieut. Hollis was in an airplane accident in which he received serious injuries about his head and face.”  A second newspaper report in the Trenton Evening Times (Trenton NJ) of 9 Sep 1918 states: “LT HOLLIS’ BODY, SUICIDE, SENT HOME. No Military Services Before It Was Shipped to Mother in Princeton. DAYTON, O., Sept 9.–The body of Second Lieut H.F. Hollis Jr., the young aviation officer who committed suicide here, is on its way to Princeton N.J., where according to the records of the Wilbur Wring aviation field, his mother lives in Nassau Street. There were no military services before the body was taken to the train, although an escort from the flying field accompanied the coffin to the railway station. Mystery still clings to the suicide of this young son of U.S. Senator H. F. Hollis of New Hampshire. The young man came to the Wilbur Wright field last July from a southern flying school. He received his commission as second lieutenant in the gunnery school here on August 7. That he had deliberately set about to end his life the police do not question. A new revolver and a new box of shells were found in the room in the hotel where the youth’s body was found about twelve hours after he had ended his life. On stationary from another hotel Lieut Hollis had written instructions to notify Mrs. H.F. Hollis, Grace Church Choir House, 88 Fourth Avenue, New York City. This address was supposed to be that of his widow. It was not until late Friday that discovery was made that Lieut Hollis was the son of Senator Hollis, who is reported to be on his way to France.” He is buried beside his mother in Princeton Cemetery, Princeton New Jersey.  Henry French Hollis Jr.’s name is engraved on the City of Concord (NH) WWI monument in Memorial Field. [My thanks to Kim Loomis, Jill McDaniel and Linda Gilmore of Nassau Presbyterian Church-Princeton Cemetery for their help locating his burial place].
[28] Harry Lambrukos was the son of son of Philip & Katherine (Belias) Lambrukos.  [See Story and Photographs]
[29] Ernest Arthur LaPlante was born 26 January 1894 in Concord NH
son of Ernest & Cordelie (Boisvert) LaPlante.  He grew up in and attended the local schools of Concord NH. In 1910 he was

1917 Postcard showing marching soldier-trainees at Camp Upton.

living in Concord NH with his parents and siblings Joseph George (who married Mary Chevalier), Edward Romeo who d in 1972 and served in WW2), Bertha Eleanor who d 1977), Frederick (who m. Florida Turgeon), Jeanette M. (who m. Ernest A. Lefebvre), Marguerite “Margaret E.” (who m. Philip Dumais), Marie Rose “Mary R.” (who m. Henry Demers), and Laurette (Sister Louis Ernest of the Sisters of the Presentation of Mary who d in 2004).  He died 30 Sep 1918 at Camp Upton near Yapank, Long Island NY, age 24 years.  His Death & Disinterment Records show he died of pneumonia due to influenza and that he was buried at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Manchester NH.
[30] Victor Willie Lemay, son of  son of John & Bridget (Cavanaugh) Lemay. [See Story and Photographs]
[31] John P. Mannion, was born about 7 June-August 1896 in Concord NH, son of
son of James P. & Beatrice “Bridget” (McDermott) Mannion.   John’s father James P. was an Irish immigrant, born in Mayo Ireland, the son of Patrick & Catharine (Reagan) Mannion.  John P. Mannion attended the local Concord NH schools, and in 1910 was living on Walker Street with his parents and siblings Katherine, James Edward, Josephine M., Ester, Louise. Later his parents would have another child,  Richard Thomas. In 1910 John’s father was working as a stone cutter.  The 1917 Concord City directory shows John P. Mannion “US Army Medical Corps.”  Military records show that John P. Mannion served as a Private in #161 Field Hospital Co., and died of pneumonia in 23 February 1919 in England.  The Armistice had been declared, but medical services were still being provided in Europe to the troops.  His body was shipped home from Liverpool England on 26 July 1920, arriving in Hoboken NJ on 7 August 1920 aboard the ship Antigone.  His service number was 3974. He was buried with honors in his family’s plot in Calvary Cemetery, Concord NH on 25 August 1920.  John P. Mannion’s name is engraved on the NH WWI Honor Roll in the New Hampshire State House, and on the City of Concord WWI monument in Memorial Field.

WWI era postcard of the Hospital at Fort Slocum, NY.

[32] John Thomas Martin was born  31 Jan 1887 in Hollowell Maine, son of Thomas & Mary Maria (Rich) Martin.  After his father’s death, his mother Mary Maria (Rich) Martin m2d abt 1890 to William C. Kerslake.  In 1900 he was 13 years old, living in Concord NH with stepfather, mother and brother. John’s brother James Martin m 4 Sep 1907 in Concord NH to Percilla Perry Mansur, daughter of Joseph & Hannah (Halloran) Mansur. John T. Martin arried on 25 Oct 1909 in Concord NH to Margaret Richardson Harris, daughter of James T. & Ada Zillas (Harvey) Harris. [[She was born 17 Aug 1885 in Southboro MA. As a long-time widow she m2d) by 1940 to Thomas Connors and removed to Southborough MA. She d 8 March 1976 in Framingham MA. (Thomas F. Connors d. 1948 in Southborough MA) and is buried in the Martin plot in Concord NH. ]] In the 1910 U.S. Census, John T. Martin is aged 24 living in Concord NH, clerk for Martin & Market. On 5 June 1917 he completed his WWI Registration form as “John K. Martin,” of 2 Blanchard St. Concord NH and he was working as a meat cutter for James Martin. He was married, of medium height and build with gray eyes and black hair.  He apparently was inducted in the U.S. Army for he was stationed at Fort Slocum, NY at the time of his death on 2 March 1918 in Manhattan, New York.  He was buried in Blossom Hill Cemetery two months later on 2 May 1918 in his family’s plot.  John Thomas Martin’s name is inscribed on the WWI Honor Roll in the New Hampshire State House, and on the City of Concord’s WWI monument in Memorial Park.
[33] George E. Matson was born July 1896 in Illinois, son of Alexander H. & Mary Kathrin (Ackerman) Matson. In 1900 George E. Matson living in New Bedford MA with his parents and a younger sister, Marguerite (she died in 1904 aged 6). In 1910 as G. Edmond Matson he was living with his parents in Bethel, Windsor Co. VT.  By 1914 he was living in Concord NH, working for his father who was president of the Matson Machine Co., machinists, and machinery manufacturers located at 2 Beacon Street.  The family lived in a house at 62 Beacon.  By the time the 1917 Concord City Directory was printed, George was in the U.S. Army.  George Edmond Matson died while serving at U.S. Army camp, Fort Oglethorpe in Georia on 18 February 1918 of acute tuberculosis.  His death is registered in nearby Chattanooga, Tennessee (Fort Oglethorpe is less than 10 miles away).  His body was returned home and buried in Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord NH.  A ceremony was held for him at Fort Oglethorpe (see Find-A-Grave page for description).  A second funeral was held locally as shown here. The Barre Daily Times (Barre, Vermont) 6 March 1918. “PRIVATE GEORGE E. MATSON. Funeral Was Held at Concord N.H., at Home of His Parents. The Concord N.H. Monitor of Feb 28, had the following account of the funeral of Private George E. Matson, grandson of Samuel Matosn of Barre and nephew of Mrs. E.A. Prindle, also of Barre: The funeral of Private George E. Matson, Concord’s first soldier to die while in the service of his country , was held from the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander H. Matson, 240 North Main Street, this afternoon. William F. Stevens, reader of the Christian Science church in this city, officiated at the service and there was singing by O.W. Crowell. A delegation from the Boys’ City club was in attendance at the service and Co. M of the state guard escorted the body to Blossom Hill Cemetery, where it was placed in the receiving tomb. Taps were sounded by the company bugler. Covering the casket was a large American flag and the flowers were profuse and very beautiful. The bearers were Frank Edmunds, and Lawrence C. Farnum, friends of the deceased; George W. Bartlett and Robert W. Brown, members of the Boys’ City club; and Ira A. Hunkins and George L. Livingston, members of Co M of the state guard. In writing to Capt. James J. Quinn of the local state guard company, expressing his regret in being unable to attend the funeral this afternoon, Hon. James W. Remick paid the following tribute to Private Matson: “I am very glad that Company M is to represent the state at the funeral of young Matson, the first Concord boy to give his life in this great world war for democracy and civilization, and I am sorry I cannot be with you. The honor in the company’s and not his, for nothing can add to the honor of dying for such a cause. Of the burial service of Concord’s first victim of the Civil war, history says: “Although the day was one of sadness it gave a mighty impulse to the war spirit generally. The times now, called for staying power and demanded sacrifices. Terrors and pains were by no means the exclusive lot of those at the front. There were gentle ones at home whose trials were not one whit let bitter.” “To these Lincoln wrote, “I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom.”  George Edmond Matson’s name is inscribe on the Concord NH City WWI monument at Memorial Field.
[34] Ernest Matthews was born 22 July 1891 in Bury, Lancashire, England, son of Henry & Mary Ann (Booth) Matthews. He immigrated with his family to the United States about 1909.  In 1901 the family was living in Heywood Lancashire, England where Ernest has siblings Eliza, Hilda (who m. in 1924 to Frank Thomas Sears), and Ada Mary (who m. 1924 to Edward Howard Blanchette). In the 1910 U.S. Census, Ernest Matthews is aged 18

Canadian death record of Ernest Matthews.

working as a laborer in a woolen mill and living in Concord NH with his parents and siblings. In 1914 he completed his Attestation papers in Canada to enlist in the military stating that he was 5 ft 8-1/4 inches tall, with a dark complexion, brown eyes, brown hair. His next of kin was listed as his sister: Miss Hilda Matthews, 96 Pleasant St. Concord.  Private Matthews unit aailed June 10 1915, his military number was 481254, and he was assigned to the 42nd Battalion CEF.  He arrived in England on 6 January 1915, went through training and then embarked for France on 9 October 1915.  He died a year later, killed in action in the field on 11 January 1916 (in Belgium).  The Boston Globe Boston MA of 24 January 1916 reported: “CONCORD N.H. SOLDIER SLAIN, MAINE MAN ILL. OTTAWA, Ont. Jan 23–Private Ernest Matthews of Concord NH was reported killed in action and Private Joseph McElhiney of Monticello Me was reported as seriously ill at the Military Hospital at Shorncliffe, in the Overseas casualty list made public tonight by the Militia Department.” He was buried at R.E. Farm Cemetery, Heuvelland, Belgium.  [Note that both of his parents died in 1918 one day apart of influenza–his father, Henry Matthews died 5 March 1918, and Mary Ann (Booth) Matthews died 6 March 1918 in Concord NH.]  Ernest Matthews is remembered on the City of Concord WWI Monument in Memorial Field.
[35] Charles John McDonald was born 15 June 1888 in Concord NH,  son of Charles J. & Margaret J. (Johnston) McDonald. Charles Sr. was a stonecutter.  He was born and raised in Concord NH where he can be found in both the 1900 and 1910 U.S. Censuses living with his parents and siblings Abbie T., Catherine A., Daniel E. (who d. 29 April 1918 in Concord NH of pulmonary TB), James F. (who m 1931 to Adah I. Salmon), William Augustine, Edward J., and Mary E. (who d. 1966).  On 5 June 1917 Charles J. McDonald’s WWI Registration form was completed by his father, a notation made that Charles J. was in Canada at the time that the registration was needed.  His address was listed as 56 Rumford Street, occupation silversmith, working for Burke Silver of Montreal Canada. He was single, of medium height and build with brown eyes and brown hair.   On 23 July 1918 he departed from New York City for Europe as a Sergeant in the 23rd Battery from Camp Jackson, South Carolina on the ship Corinthic. His Service number was 388017.  He survived several battles of the war but lost the one with disease, for he died on 17 January 1919 of tuberculosis in France.   When the war ended his body was returned to the United States aboard the ship, Sherman on 11 September 1920 from St. Nazaire, France to Hoboken NJ.  He was in Battery E, 115th Field Artillery at that time.  He was buried in Calvary Cemetery,  Concord NH.  His name is engraved on the WWI Honor Roll in Doric Hall of the NH State House, and on the City of Concord WWI monument in Memorial Field.
[36] Harold William McNeil was born 30 April 1896 in Concord NH, son of John William & Catherine Ellen “Katie” (Supry) McNeil. In the 1910 U.S. Census he was living in Concord NH with parents and brother Ralph James.  Harold W. McNeil married on 30 Aug 1915 in Penacook NH to Sarah Ellen Shortsleeve, daughter of George & Sarah Ellen (Mattot) Shortsleeve. She m2d) in Ferrisburg VT on 23 Oct 1919 to William James Laflam . [[Harold McNeil and Sarah E. Shortsleeve had a daughter Beatrice Mae McNeil who was born in 1915 and married 19 May 1944 in Penacook NH to John Sweet, son of John & Evelyn Alice (Bodfish) Sweet. She d. 19 Sep 1989 in Middlebury VT.]]  On 5 June 1917 Harold William McNeil completed his

U.S. Naval Hospital, Chelsea MA. Surgeon, nurse and corpsman examine a patient in Ward 6, Group 1, 2 June 1919. U.S. Navy History and Heritage Command Photograph.

WWI Registration form. He was living in Boscawen/Penacook NH, working as a weaver in the Harris Emory Company.  He stated that he had support of wife and child. He was of medium height and build with blue eyes and brown hair.  By December of 1917 he was already serving in the U.S. Navy as The Bennington Banner newspaper (Bennington VT) of 21 Dec 1917 reported: “Harold McNeil is visiting his brother R. McNeil in White Creek. He is in the navy and just returned from France. He landed in Halifax two hours after the terrible disaster and relates heart-rendering scenes.”  The U.S. Navy Casualties Book 1776-1941 relates the following: “McNEIL HAROLD WILLIAM, seaman, second class, United States Naval Reserve Force.  Enrolled: Boston Mass, April 1, 1918.  Died: First Naval District, Boston, Mass. April 14, 1918.  Cause: lobar pneumonia.  Next of kin: Wife, Mrs. Harold William McNeil, 102 North Main Street, Penacook NH.  He was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Concord NH. Harold William McNeil’s name appears on the City of Concord WWI monument in Memorial Field.
[37] Charles H. Moberg Jr. was born 23/24 April 1896 in Boston MA, son of Charles H. & Mary E. (Lavery) Moberg.  In 1900 he was living with his family at 118 Bennington Street in Boston MA, and in 1910 on Centennial Avenue in Revere MA.  He attended local schools in both of those places. His siblings included Agnes (in 1940 a teacher in Concord NH, d. 1995 Laconia NH), Frank Everett who d. 1966 in FL), and Dorothy Ruth [who m1st) Merrit L. Hulett and m2nd) 1947 Loren Abraham Mitchell and d. 22 April 2006 in Laconia NH].  On 5 June 1917 Charles H. Moberg Jr. completed his WWI Draft Registration at Concord NH. He was living at 169 Pleasant Street in Concord NH, working as a boiler maker helper for the B&M RR in Concord. Single. He was of medium height and build with blue eyes and light hair. The newspapers printed conflicting stories and this was reflected in the following press release of 29 Dec 1918 in the Boston Globe: “CONCORD N.H. – Dec 28 — Positive proof has been secured of the death of Corp. Charles H. Moberg, at first reported killed in action in France, and later slightly wounded, both reports coming from the War Department to his parents Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Moberg of 169 Pleasant Street.”  The Honor Roll of the 78th Division in WWI shows: MOBERG, CHARLES H. Cpl. Co. M 309th Infantry 11/1/18 W.  Corporal Charles H. Moberg Jr. was killed in Action on 1 November 1918 in the Grand Pre Offensive.  When the war ended his body was returned to the United States where a military funeral was held. The Boston Sunday Globe — September 11, 1921. FUNERALS OF TWO WORLD WAR HEROES IN CONCORD.CONCORD, N.H. Sept 10–Military funerals were held this morning for Lieut. Paul E. Corriveau and Corp. Charles H. Moberg whose bodies were received in this city from France this week. The local post of the American legion was in charge, furnishing a band, pallbearers, escorts and firing squads. The funeral of  …. Corp. Moberg [was held] from St. John’s Church. Rev. J.E. Mancy officiating. There was a very large attendance at both services. …. Corp Moberg, another Concord High School boy, was in the employ of the Boston & Maine Railroad when he went overseas as a member of Co. M, 309th, Infantry, 78th Division. He was killed in action Nov 1, 1918 in the Grand Pre offensive. He is survived by his parents Mr. and Mrs. Charles Moberg, two sisters and a brother, all of this city.” His exact burial location in Concord NH is not known. Corporal Moberg’s name is engraved on the NH Roll of Honor in Doric Hall of the New Hampshire State House, and on the City of Concord WWI monument in Memorial Park.
[38] Theresa [Teresa] Murphy was the daughter of Thomas & Ellen (Heaney) Murphy.  [See Story and Photographs]
[39] Frank Opie was born 22 Sep 1892 in Concord NH, son of John & Mary Jane (Gienty) Opie. He attended the local schools of Concord NH where his father worked as a stonecutter, and Frank had two siblings, Harry and Willis.   He completed his WWI Registration form on 5 June 1917 at Boston MA where he was living at 174 West Newton Street. He was working as a brakeman for the Union Freight Railroad in Boston. He describes himself as single, 5’6″ 156 lbs with brown hair and dark hair.  During WWI he enlisted as part of a recruitment and replacement for Company E 14th Engineers (Railway). [I wrote a separate story on the 14th Railway Engineers here].  On 27 Feb 1918 he departed for Europe.  The Gold Star Mothers of Massachusetts book details: “Ent. 21 Sept 1917, Co. E, 301st Engrs, 76th Div.; trans 28 Dec to Co. C 14th Engrs. (attached to Co A, 11th Engrs) Overseas 27 Feb 1918.”  Private Frank Opie died of wounds received in action on 12 April 1918 in France. When the war ended, his body was returned home and buried in Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH. His service is credited to Boston MA.  Frank Opie’s name is inscribed on the Concord WWI monument at Memorial Field.
[40] Harold Raymond Rogers | was born 13 October 1889 in Lexington MA, son of William Allen & Myra Ellen (Currier) Rogers.  By the 1910 U.S. Census he was living in Concord NH with his family.  He had a brother, George A. Rogers, who died in 1901 in Weston MA.  He married on 22 Jan 1911 at New Bedford MA to Yvonne Adeline LaForest, dau of John B. & Maria L. LaForest. Harold R. Rogers completed his WWI Registration form in Nashua NH on 5 June 1917 where he was living at 2 Crown Street. He was working as an independent caterer, was married and had a wife and child. He was a Sargent in the NH National Guard Infantry, having served for 12 years. He was of medium height and build with blue eyes and light hair. [His service is also acknowledge on the Nashua NH listing of WWI casualties]. He died on 13 October 1918 at the Post Hospital, Fort Ethan Allen of pneumonia and influenza, the death reported at Colchester VT.  He is buried in buried Wildwood Cemetery, Chittenden VT.  Harold R. Roger’s service is recognized on the WWI Honor Roll in Doric Hall of the NH State House, and on the City of Concord WWI monument at Memorial Field.
[41] Joseph “Joe” Sanel  was born about 1891 in Lithuania. He was brother to  Benjamin, David, and Berchik Sanel (Benjamin and David Sanel settled in Concord, New Hampshire).  In the 1919 City of Concord Directory, Joseph was boarding at the house of his brother Benjamin at 20 Clinton Street and was listed as being in the U.S. Army.   A death certificate was created by the City of Manchester in order to bury the body of a Private Joseph Sanel, who had been killed in action in France on 2 November 1918.  His former residence was Concord NH and he was buried in the Hebrew Cemetery in Manchester New Hampshire on 28 April 1922.  The document notes that he served in Co. B of the 148th Infantry. The will of Joseph Sanel had been probated in Concord NH on 14 October 1919, Benjamin and Davis Sanel as co-executors.  This would all seem to be straight forward, however there are possible complications to this story.  In the book Family Riklis by Abe Louis Riklis published in 2015 he describes an incident reportedly involving the father of Yetta (Sanel) Riklis in which her father, Joseph Sanel (who appears to be the same one here mentioned) switches dog tags in the battlefield with a dead soldier.  This same book relates how after WWI ends Joseph Sanel and his wife Deborah are living in South Africa.  If that story is true then an unknown soldier is buried in Manchester NH. The name of Joseph Sanel can be found inscribed on the NH Honor Roll in the New Hampshire State House and on the City of Concord monument in Memorial Field.
[42] Arthur Oliver Thompson  was born 12 Jan 1886 in Gilmanton NH (reported from Farmington NH),  son of Albert W. & Ella F. (Eaton) Thompson. The 1910 U.S. Census shows Arthur living with his parents in Concord NH, his birth information at that time given as January 1886 in NH.  He had a sister  May Belle Thompson born in 1894.  In 1910 he was a student, boarding at his parent’s house on 114 South State Street Concord NH where his father Albert was working as the High School janitor.  Arthur O. Thompson married 26 Jan 1911 in Rockingham, Windham Co VT to Grace Winifred Badger, dau of Wesley Samuel & Nettie Louise (Kimpton) Badger. His occupation at that time was brake

Capt. Arthur O. Thompson from History of the 72nd Canadian Infantry Battalion

man.  He may have been working near Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada for the railroad when he enlisted in the 11th Canadian Rifles in March/April of 1916 [his wife’s address was 541 B Princess Ave, Medicine Hat, Canada.  At the time of his enlistment, like several other enlistees I have previously mentioned, Arthur Oliver Thompson provided incorrect information stating that he was born in Bristol, England, yet all the other corroborating information matches with this Arthur Oliver Thompson born on the same date in New Hampshire [for example, his records show that his mother was Mrs Ella F. Thompson, 74 Allison St, Concord NH]. Canadian documents show that he stood 5 ft 10-1/2 inches tall, had a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. He was assigned the Regiment No. 116209.  Final documents in the Canadian archives show that he was shipped to the Shorncliffe Army Camp in England on 8 August 1916 aboard the S S Lapland.  He served with the 72nd battalion and on 10 July 18 he sprained his ankle but recovered and returned to action.  His final action was on 29 September 1918 when he was killed on the battlefield.  He was buried (and still remains) in the Sancourt British Cemetery, France. Arthur Oliver Thompson’s photograph can be found on the Find-a-grave page linked previously. His name is inscribed on the City of Concord WWI monument at Memorial Park.

From Dartmouth College Honor Book

[43] Raymond Whiton Thompson was born on 8 April 1888 in Concord NH, son of Willis Duer & Abby M. “Abbie” (Whiton) Thompson.  In the 1900 and 1910 U.S. Census records he is living in Concord NH with his parents, and sibling Willis Duer Thompson, Jr. (who m. Frances Heath). Raymond W. Thompson married on 12 October 1914 in Concord NH to Margaret Carpenter, daughter of Arthur H. & Anna (Kelley) Carpenter.  He completed his WWI Draft Registration on 5 June 1918 at Concord NH. He was living at 35 Warren Street in concord, working as a hardware merchant for Thompson & Hoague Co. He was married. His prior military service was as a C.H.S. Cadet for 4 years (Concord High School). He described himself of medium height and build with blue eyes and brown hair.  The local newspapers reported his death. The Boston Globe 14 Sep 1918, page 10. “LIEUT THOMPSON DEAD.  Lieut. Raymond W. Thompson Quartermaster Corps, U.S.A. died at the Lancaster Hospital, Brookline, yesterday of pneumonia, following an attack of Spanish influenza. He was a son of Mr & Mrs. Willis D.Thompson of Concord NH and had been associated with his father in business. He was educated at Lawrenceville NJ and at Dartmouth College. Besides his parents, he is survived by a wife and by a brother, Willis D. Thompson Jr. Who is in the aviation service [in France]. 2nd Lieutenant Raymond W. Thompson is buried in Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord NH.  His name is recognized on the NH WWI Honor Roll in Doric Hall of the NH State House, and on the City of Concord WWI monument in Memorial Field.
[44] Harry Howard Turcotte  was born 7 June 1886 in Concord NH, son of William H. & Emma (Saltmarsh) Turcotte. He married 10 March 1916 in Concord NH to Katherine Boyd, daughter of Thompson & Rose (Hill) Boyd. They divorced 10 May 1918.  He completed his WWI Draft Registration from on 5 June 1917 in Campton, Grafton Co. NH. He noted his residence as 96 Rumford Street in Concord while he was a laborer in Woodstock Lumber Camp, Campton NH. He described himself as short and stout with light blue eyes and dark brown hair.  On 22 June 1918 was a Private in Co. B, 148th Infantry, service Number 1748653 when he was sent to Europe on 22 June 1918 from Newport News VA.  At that time he listed friend in Center

Ypres wounded and dead, from U.S. National Archives video.

Sandwich NH as his contact, which led to a newspaper notice  of 12 December 1918 attributing him to Sandwich NH.  P1c Harry Howard Turcotte died of wounds received in action on 3 November 1918 in France (probably during the Ypres-Lys campaign when the 148th Regiment took heavy losses from machine gun and shell fire while crossing the Schedlt River in Belgium). His body was returned home after the war departing Antwerp Belgium on 28 Dec 1921 aboard the ship, Crook. A New Hampshire Death & Disbursement form shows that he was place in Blossom Hill Tomb, Concord NH on 27 January 1922 and buried later.  He is on the NH Adjutant General Casualty List for Concord NH, and his name can be found on the NH WWI Honor Roll in the New Hampshire State House, and on the Concord NH WWI monument at Memorial Field.
[45] Ralph A. Turgeon, son of Arthur J. & Obeline (Bourque) Turgeon. [See Story and Photographs].
[46] Carl Vernon Whidden was born 22 Nov 1889 in Freeport, Cumberland Co., Maine, son of Frank E. & Susan C. “Susie” (Philbrick) Whidden.  As early as 1893 Carl’s family had moved to 15 Lyndon Street in Concord NH where  his father Frank Whidden worked as a stone cutter.  Carl attended the local schools in Concord, and had one sibling,

90th Division Troops Passing Through Cunel France, Oct 27, 1918. U.S. Govt.

Harold Philbrick Whidden [b Jan 1893 NH, moved to Long Island, Queens NY, married Dora E. Todd and had children Dora A. (Whidden) Glueck, Harold Philbrick Jr., and Marguerite Marie (Whidden) Gaperetti. He also had another son, Carl Vernon Whidden b 1925 d 2013 in Sarasota FL who had children: Marguerite Hein, Carl Jr, and Jay.] By 1908 Carl was employed by the Concord Monitor newspaper, and in 1910 he was an apprentice in the printing industry.   On 24 December 1917 Carl V Whidden was a Private in Battery C, 146th Field Artillery sailing to Europe from New York City on the ship S S Lapland. At that time he listed his place of residence with his brother in Long Island, NY.  Records show that Wagoner Carl V. Whidden died on 27 October 1918 at Cunel France.  When the war ended, his body was returned to the United States on 2 July 1921 aboard the ship Wheaton. His service number was 138207. His final resting place (cemetery) is not known, and his service is attributed to New York state.   Carl V. Whidden’s name is engraved on the City of Concord WWI monument in Memorial Park.
[47] Leslie Guy Whiteman was born 23 July 1891 in Benton, Grafton Co. NH, son of Fred E. & Della Eva (Spooner) Whiteman.  In 1900 he was living in Littleton, Grafton Co. NH with his family and sibings: Golda Hazel (who m1st 1915 to Louis Joseph Dionne; m2d) Howard Huckins; m3d in 1939 to Phillip Doying), Roscoe H. (who d. in 1925) and Mattie (who m. Lee Hanchette).   Leslie Guy Whiteman completed his WWI Registration form on 5 June 1917 at Rochester NH. [He listed him self as born 23 July 1900, Benton NH] His occupation was “chipper” for Walter Clarke, Franklin NH.  He noted that he had served as a private in the NH National Guard Infantry for 7 years, and described himself as being single, short and of medium build with blue eyes and light brown hair.  During WWI Leslie G. Whiteman served as a Private in Co. E, 103rd Infantry and was shipped to Europe on 25 September 1917 from the port of New York City aboard the ship Saxonia.  War was not only a deadly business but many went missing in action due to the horrible conditions of the battlefields and the scattering of bodies during explosions. Leslie G. Whiteman is one of those fallen heroes whose remains were not positively identified using the technology available at the time (basically IDed by dogtags, clothing, body markings). Leslie G. Whiteman was considered Killed in Action on 17 July 1918 when he was missing, near Belleau, France. His name is engraved on the Tablets of the Missing, Aisne-Marne American Cemetery, France.  He is credited to Rochester NH.  His name is engraved on the NH WWI Honor Roll in Doric Hall of the New Hampshire State House, and on the Concord City WWI monument in Memorial Field.
[48] Woodbury Davis Hagan |was born 11 February 1894 in Woodstock, New Brunswick Canada, son of Fred S. & Edith M. (McLean) Hagan. In 1900 Woodbury was living in Goffstown NH with parents and brother Harald D. Hagan (1893-1915). In 1910 he was living with his family in Bow, Merrimack Co. NH. He married 20 Aug 1914 in Vermont to Mae Morgan, daughter of Bertha Morgan. Their stillborn child was born and died 1916 in Concord NH, buried Blossom Hill Cemetery.  In June of 1917 Woodbury Hagan was 23 and living at 206 No Main Street in Concord NH. At that time he was a laborer at the Merrimack County Farm with a physical description of tall and slender with grey eyes and brown hair.  On 16 Feb 1918 he departed the United States for Europe, a Corporal in the 120th Aero Squadron. At that time his wife May Hagan of Concord NH is listed as his next of kin. He died of disease while serving in France on 24 Sep 1918.  When the war ended, his remains were returned home, and he is buried in Alexander Cemetery, Bow Junction NH.  His name does not appear on the Concord NH monument at Memorial Field, but his name is engraved on the NH Roll of Honor in Doric Hall of the New Hampshire State House.
[49] Chester William Woods was born 30 June 1893 in Lambton PQ Canada, son of Thomas & Amelia M. (Cross) Woods.  In the 1901 Canadian Census Chester Woods is living with his parents and siblings, Victor R. and Eva M. Woods, in South Ireland, Megantic, Quebec Canada.  The family immigrated to the United States in 1908. hester W. Woods completed his WWI Registration Form, a resident of Concord NH at 27 So State Street. His occupation was “Automobile Repair Man for Hall Bros. 35 S. Main Street Concord NH.”  He noted he was single with his mother and sister as dependents. He describes himself as being of medium height and stature with brown eyes and light brown hair. 6 months later he married on 15 Nov 1917 in Concord NH to Theresa Earilda Gunn, daughter of William H. & Effie Z. (Teachier) Gunn.   Chester W. Woods died on 1 October 1918 at the Hitchcock Hospital in Concord NH of “grippe” and broncho-pneumonia, duration one week.  Previous residence was Concord NH. He was interred in Summer Street Cemetery Lancaster NH.  He is listed on the NH WWI Honor Roll in the NH State House, but not on any Concord NH plaques or honor rolls.  Chester W. Woods was probably part of the Dartmouth College Training Cantonment, located in Hanover NH.


[Editor’s Note: this story is part of an on-going series about heroic New Hampshire men and women of World War I.  Look here for the entire listing].

This entry was posted in History, Military of New Hampshire, NH WW1 Military and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to New Hampshire World War I Military: Heroes of Concord

  1. Shawna Rose-Wickmark says:

    Great job on this story

  2. Pingback: World War I Memorials in Concord New Hampshire | Cow Hampshire

  3. Pingback: New Hampshire World War I Military: Heroes of The Great War | Cow Hampshire

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.