New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Cornish and Plainfield

Since these towns are adjacent to each other in New Hampshire, I decided to write one story about both, based on the names on their WWI memorial plaques. Previously I wrote about Harry Dickinson Thrasher from Plainfield, and now I will mention the rest of the heroes.

Plainfield NH World War I honor roll. Photograph by Mary King, Director of the Philip Read Memorial Library. Used with permission.

Mary King, the Director of the Philip Read Memorial Library in Plainfield took a photographs of that town’s memorial and it is engraved as follows. [Editor’s notes not found on the honor roll monuments are in brackets].

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HONOR ROLL

1914-1918
PLAINFIELD NH
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ANACNOSTOPOULOS, COSTAS
BAILEY, FRED L.
BAILEY, WAYNE E.
CHADBOURNE, RALPH P.  [Wagoner, later Sergeant, Company I, 56th Engineers]
CLARK, CLARENCE H.
CROSSMAN, HOMER
–NA, ANDREW

Man and horse with gas mask. From Plainfield [NH] Historical Society; photograph from the Baynes collection. Used here with permission

ECCLESTON, WILLIAM E.
HADLEY, LEON
HAYWARD, CRISWOLD S.
HILL, ALBERT E.
HUNT, HUGH
HUSE, ERNEST L.
JENNEY, CHESTER E.
JENNEY, RAY F.
JORDAN, BYRON C.
KELSEY, HOWARD P.
KIMBALL, CHAS. F.
MEYETTE, JOSEPH C.
MORSE, ROY V.
PENNIMAN, T. KENNETH
PETERSON, HALL
PIERSON, NORMAN N.
RICE, HARRY
ROGERS, FRED A.
RUGGLE, HAROLD L.
THRASHER, HARRY D.
TOWNE, ELMER C.
WATSON, LEONARD
WEST, HAZEN F.
WILDER, ROBERT A.
WILDEY, PAUL B.

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KILLED DURING WARTIME FROM PLAINFIELD
THRASHER, HARRY D. [SEE story written about him in a separate blog story]
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Lieut. Cyril T. Hunt, killed during an airplane training event in Florida during WW1. Photograph property of Patsy, a relative. Used here with written permission.

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CORNISH HONOR ROLL
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[See an example of the Cornish WWI Honor Roll]


HONOR ROLL

WWI
CORNISH
NEW HAMPSHIRE

/left/
HUNT, CYRIL T.
HUNT, GEORGE E.
WATERMAN, J.K.
KNAPP, R.H.
YOUNG, W.A.
FITCH, H.A.
NEIDER, LOUIS L.
KENYON, C.E.
MILNER, H.A.
BURR, JULIUS H.
DOLAN, W.H.
WITHERILL, E.W.

GORDON, S.B. [Samuel B. Gordon son of Mrs. Ella]
COX, LEONARD
BARTLETT, ELMER C.
PLATT, WILLIAM

/right/
CHASE, G.A.
FITCH, FRANK W.
CHASE, M.
PLATT, C.C. [Clayton C. Platt son of Annie L. Platt]
DAVIDSON, R.P.
BLAKE, ROY F.
ST. GAUDENS, H.
HICKS, A.W.
STAPLES, D.C.
FURNESS, J.
KENYON, C.M.
COOK, BERT E.
ROWE, GEORGE J.

QUIMBY, ARTHUR W.
DREW, FRANK P.
FITCH, LEWIS E.
[Missing from this list:Tharon R. Tewksbury and Joseph H. Bean]

Photograph postcard of Cornish NH memorials: Civil (statue), WWI (dark plaque) and WW2 (painted wooden sign). Property of J.W. Brown.

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RECORD OF MEN FROM CORNISH NH Who Entered War Service (WWI)

The 1920 Annual Report for the Town of Cornish provided the following Roll and Record of Men from Cornish, N.H. Who Entered War Service Against Germany– 1916-1919, transcribed here:

NAME|Age|Date of entrance into service| Br of Ser.| Department| Company|Regiment| Promotion of Commission|Date of Promotion or Commission| Killed or Wounded|
Date of Discharge|Time with A.E.F. Overseas||

Bartlett, Elmer C.|33|*A.|Locomotive Eng.|Co.E|14th Engineers|Private 1st Class|June 10, 1917|Gassed Mar. 21,’18|May 2, 1919|21 Months||
Blake, Roy Fred|23|May 8, 1917|A|Cavalry|Hdq. Troop|2nd Cavalry|1st Class Private>Corporal>Sergeant|Oct. 14, 1917-Dec. 1, 1918-June 26, 1919|Accidentally Shot|July 12, 1919|14 months||
Burr, Julius H.|22|May 24, 1917|C.|Ambulance|–|–|Corporal| Jan. 27,1919|–|Oct. 14, 1919| 14 Months||
Chase, Charles Amos|25|April 30, 1918|A.|Auto, Mechanic|–|–|Corporal|March 8, 1919|–|June 16, 1919|11M..1Wk.||
Chase, McKinley|21|Oct. 22, 1918|C.|Coast Artillery|1st Truc|60th Am’n Train| –|–|–|Dec. 16, 1918|–||
Cook, Bert Edward|24|Dec. 12, 1917|A.|Motor Mechanic|10th|4th|Corporal|May 1st, 1918| –|July 21, 1919|12 Months||
-(1)Cox, Leonard|23|April 28, 1917|A.|Infantry|B|305th|2nd Lieutenant>1st Lieutenant|–|Apr. 28, 1917|–|July 24, 1919|–||
Davidson, Reginald P.|22|April 26, 1918|C.|Infantry|3rd Provisional H|309th|To Mechanic| June 1918|–|May 2, 1919 | 11 Months||
Dolan, William H.|19|Aug. 26, 1916|A|Artillery|E Bat. 3d Co. F.A.|–|Corporal|Feb. 9, 1917|–|–|–||
Drew, Frank P.|32|Aug 6, 1918|A|Chem War Ser’ce|A|–|–|–|–|Dec. 11, 1918|-||
Fitch, Harold Alfred|26|June 27, 1918|C.|Field Artillery|Battery C|301st|–|–|–|Ja 18, 1919|–||
Fitch, Frank William|23|June 30, 1917|A.|Inf. Medical|Hospital|312th| Corporal>Sergeant>Serg’nt 1st Class|Oct. 15, 1917>Dec. 15, 1917>Feb. 15, 1918|–|July 1, 1919|–||
Fitch, Lewis Elmer|19|Oct. 7, 1918|C.|Infantry|F|1st. S.A.T.C.|–|–|–|Dec. 14, 1918|–||
Furness, Gerald|21|Oct. 22, 1918|C.|Artillery|1st Truck|60th Am’n Train|–|–|–|Apr. 5, 1919|–||
Gaudens, Homer Saint-|36|June 1, 1917|A.|Engineers Camouflage C’rps|A|40th Engineers|1st Lieutenant>Captain|Aug. 15, 1917>May 8. 1918|–|Feb. 5, 1919|12 Months.
Gordon, Samuel B.|29|Oct. 5, 1918|C.|Infantry|Headquarters|301st|1st Class Private|May, 1919|–|July 16, 1919|12 Months||
Hicks, Arthur W.|Aug. 5, 1918|C.|–|G’d & Fire Co. 328|Army Sup. Base|–|–|–|Dec. 8, 1918|–||
Hunt, George E.|27|March 11, 1918|A.|Airplane|17th Photo Unit|–|1st Class Private|–|–|May 7, 1919|8 months
Hunt, Cyril Thomas|21|Dec.21, 1917|A.|Airplane|7th Cadet Squad|–|2nd Lieutenant| Nov 1, 1918|Ac. Kil’d Jan.27’19|(2)|–||
Hunt, Raeburn S.|18|July 18, 1918|A.|Infantry|R.S.A.T.C.|4th Battalion|2nd Lieutenant|Sept. 16, 1918|–|Dec. 16, 1918|–||
Kenyon, Carrol E.|23|July 25, 1918|A.|Infantry|G|74th|1st Class Private|Dec. 2, 1918|–|Jan. 22, 1919|–||
Kenyon, George M.|19|Feb 11, 1918|A.|Airplane|25th|Aviation Corps|–|–|–| Jan.24 1919 |–||
Knapp, Raymond H.|19|Feb. 28, 1918|A.|Aviat’n Sec. S.C.|–|–|–|–|W’n’d Left Leg|July 8, 1919|11 Months||
Milner, Howard A.|20|Dec.–, 1917|A.|Aviation|32d Squadron|3rd Provisional|–|–|–|–|–||
Neider, Louis L.|26|July 6, 1916|A.|Infantry|Supply|103rd|–|–|W’n’d Left Hip|April 28, 1919|18 Months||
Platt, William|20|Apr. 1, 1917|E.|Naval Aviation|–|–|Ensign>Lieut. Jr. Grade|Mar. 16, 1918>Apr 1, 1919|–|March. 21, 1919>Aug. 26. 1919|5 Months||
Platt, Clayton C.|21|May 13, 1919|A.|Artillery|Aus. 2, Park Bat.|2d C’ps Art Park|Mechanic|Aug. 9, 1919|–|Aug. 26, 1919|13 Months||
Quimby, Arthur W.|20|Oct. 12, 1918|C.|–|H|Har.Uit.S.A.T.C.|–|–|–|Dec. 7, 1918||
Rowe, George J.|25|May 17, 1918|A.|Aviation|Constr’c’n. Co. 16|–|–|–|–| Aug. 27, 1918|–||
Staples, Daniel G.|29|June 16, 1918|C.|Infantry|Headquarters Co.|74th|1st Class Private|Nov. 1, 1918|–|Jan.22, 1919|–||
Waterman, John K.|23|Sept. 24, 1917|A.|Quart’mas’r R C.|–|–|Q.M. Sergeant>2nd Lieut. Q.M.C.|April, 1918>Sept. 17, 1918|–|Sept. 4, 1919|–||
Witherill, Elwyn W.|24|May 2, 1918|A.|Ordnance|–|–|Ordnance Serg’t|July 2, 1919|–|Sept. 5, 1919|13 Months||
Young, Wesley A.|18|Feb. 25, 1918|A.|Aviation|35th Balloon|–|–|–|–|May 6, 1919|6 Months||

LEGEND: *Branch of Service–(A) Regular Army; (C) National Army; (E) Naval Reserves. (1) Awarded Distinguished Service Honors by U.S.A. France and Belgium. (2) Killed in airplane accident. The above records are incomplete, but contain all the information received to date. If any errors are discovered in these Records please notify me, F.J. Franklyn, Town War Historian.

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KILLED DURING WARTIME
(FROM CORNISH NH)
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Photograph of Cyril T. Hunt from “The New Hampshire” a publication of New Hampshire College (now UNH) in 1919

Cyril Thomas Hunt, son of Edmund Bennett & Martha Maude (Soule) Hunt, b. 9 June 1896 Cornish NH, died 27 January 1919 at Arcadia FL, military aviator during an air accident. He is buried at Child Cemetery, Cornish, Sullivan Co. NH.

In 1900 Cyril T. Hunt was living in Cornish NH with parents and siblings: George Edmund Hunt (b 6 Dec 1890, d. 18 April 1980 West Haven CT), Mildred Lucille Hunt (b. 12 Jan 1892, d. 18 Aug 1995, m. Charles A. Goodwin), Leigh Waterman Hunt (b. 26 Sep 1893 and d. 25 March 1985 Hamden CT), Olive Louise Hunt (b 22 Oct 1894, d. 15 Dec 1994 Lebanon NH, m. John David Durward) and Raeburn Stanley Hunt (b 10 August 1899, d. 27 Dec 1935). In 1903 he would have another sibling, Barbara Irma Hunt (b 5 Dec 1903, d. 25 March 1994 Concord NH, m. Robert Ford).

Photograph of Cyril T. Hunt in uniform. Property of Patsy, a relative. Used with written permission.

In 1900 the New Hampshire magazine, published by New Hampshire College (now called University of New Hampshire) provided a brief biography, and stated this about him: “Word reached the members of the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity, early this week of the death of Lieut. Cyril T. Hunt, ’19, at Carlstrom Field, Arcadia, Florida…..Cyril T. Hunt, better known to all as “Cy” Hunt, came to New Hampshire College in the fall of 1915 from Kimball Union Academy. Before coming here he was a member of the Kimball Union Academy baseball team for two years. From the time of his entrance here “Cy” Hunt was always an active student. He was a member of the Rope Pull of his class for two years, was a member of the class football team for two years and the class baseball team for one year. He was a member of the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity and Alpha Chi Sigma (Chemical) fraternity. He left here early in 1918 to take up aviation and in the spring of 1918 he was awarded a commission as second lieutenant in the aviation service. Recently he has been stationed at Carlstrom field, Florida, as –. He had planned to stay in the aviation service even after the war and to apply for a commission in the aerial mail service. His work while in the aviation service was of a high degree...”

The Tampa Tribune (Tampa FL) 28 Jan 1919, Tues, page 1 regarding air plane accident of Lieutenant Cyril T. Hunt.

Several newspapers reported on his death, one in particular giving a bit more detail: The Tampa Tribune (Tampa FL) 28 Jan 1919, Tues, page 1. Aviator Lieutenant Hunt is Killed From A Fall At Arcadia. “CARLSTROM FIELD, ARCADIA, Jan. 27.–(Special)–Lieut. Cyril T. Hunt of Cornish Flat, N.H. was instantly killed here today when his airplane crashed 500 feet to the ground. Lieutenant Hunt was manouvering and “shadow-shooting” at the time of the accident. Officers who have examined the plane have not determined the cause of the accident, but think the fall due probably to the plane being “stalled.” The body of the aviator will be sent from Arcadia tomorrow to Cornish Flat.

 

 

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In addition to those who went to war, there were countless hometown men and women who did their part through local organizations, the Red Cross, women’s sewing circles and of course there were those who served on the New Hampshire governor’s “Commitee of One Hundred.”

This Committee of One Hundred included a Committee on Public Safety which had a subcommittee for Emergency Food Production Committee (1918)that included Fred A. Rogers, Plainfield.   The Aviation Committee included Louis E. Shipman, Plainfield.  The “Four Minute Men” were a group of volunteers authorized by United States President Woodrow Wilson, to give four-minute speeches on topics given to them by The Committee on Public Information. Those members were Harry F. Lake, Concord, Chairman and Louis E. Shipman, Plainfield, Chairman.   In addition each town and city in New Hampshire had a “Local Committee” of people who kept track of who served in the military and other duties.  The Chairmen of Local Committees included Cornish–William E. Beaman, and Plainfield–Albion E. Long.

[Editor’s Note: this story is part of an on-going series about heroic New Hampshire men and women of World War I.  Look here for the entire listing].

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10 Responses to New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Cornish and Plainfield

  1. Pingback: New Hampshire World War I Military: Heroes of The Great War | Cow Hampshire

  2. Amy says:

    Just wanted to let you know that I was having a discussion about the impact World War I had on small communities in New Zealand with Su Leslie, a genealogy and photography blogger, and I referred her here so that she could see the impact it had on small communities in the US as well. What a terrible tragedy that war was—as are all wars. After watching the film/TV series The Vietnam War, I felt hollowed out.

    • Janice Brown says:

      Amy, that WW1 affected the entire world, and entire communities large and small, is why I am so surprised that so little was written about the every day lives of people during that time. It was not just the war, as terrible as it was, that split families apart, but also the many influences from women having a great presence in business and non-home occupations which helped propel them toward obtaining the vote, to the wiping out of entire families from influenza. It pulled communities together too in many ways as they worked to keep food on their tables. I highly recommend a series I am in the middle of watching called Our World War which is well done and gives you a birds eye view of what the early days of WWI was like for the British troops. Thank you for referring my stories to others researching this War. As for the Vietnam War, that too affected us but in dramatically different ways.

      • Amy says:

        Thanks, Janice—I will check it out. I am not sure how you can spend so much time immersed in so much tragedy. But then I guess that’s what those of us who love history are doing. History was never about the happy times, was it?

  3. George Chapman says:

    Appreciate the extensive Thrasher family. Harry was a first cousin of my grandfather (who was son of Ned Thrasher, brother of Harry’s father Wallace). Harry’s younger sister Flora was well known to me when I was growing up. I visited her and her husband Jerry (LaFountain) numerous times. They lived in South Woodstock, Vermont.
    From your comments, I guess we are related.

    • Janice Brown says:

      George, thank you for reading and commenting. Yes, you and I would be distant cousins through the Eastman line I mention. That would also make you a distant cousin to Daniel Webster, the famed orator of New Hampshire through Daniel’s mother’s Eastman line.

  4. Michael says:

    I’m curious what kind of plane Cyril Hunt was flying – probably a bi-plane. Given that WWI was the first war to include major use of air forces, I wonder how safe/reliable (or not) the planes were, or did they often stall?

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