New Hampshire WWI Military: More Heroes of Coos County

The WWI soldiers in these biographies were credited to a town in Coos County, New Hampshire. WWI deaths were attributed to a specific town based on a variety of criteria that was not always consistent from town to town. Their attributed location could have been their birth place, or where they married, or where they registered for the World War I Draft. Other reasons were they indicated the town as their last known address, or noted some next of kin or friend living there during wartime. Continue reading

New Hampshire WWI Military: More Heroes of Cheshire County

The WWI soldiers in these biographies were credited to a town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire. WWI deaths were attributed to a specific town based on a variety of criteria that was not always consistent from town to town. Their attributed location could have been their birth place, or where they married, or where they registered for the World War I Draft. Other reasons were they indicated the town as their last known address, or noted some next of kin or friend living there during wartime. Continue reading

New Hampshire WWI Military: More Heroes of Sullivan County

Illustration of WWI soldier injured in the field from American Legion magazine.

The WWI soldiers in these biographies were credited to a town in Sullivan County, New Hampshire. WWI deaths were attributed to a specific town based on a variety of criteria that was not always consistent from town to town. Their attributed location could have been their birth place, or where they married, or where they registered for the World War I Draft. Other reasons were they indicated the town as their last known address, or noted some next of kin or friend living there during wartime. Continue reading

New Hampshire WWI Military: They Died of Disease

Photograph of the Base Hospital at Camp Devens MA. Property of the blog editor.

The United States World War One Centennial Commission has published an excellent narrative on the infectious diseases of World War I. The so-called Spanish Flu (that was not Spanish at all) was the primary killer of the World War I era, however measles, tuberculosis and other communicable illness took their toll.

Due to the crowding in army camps and transport ships many soldiers died before they even had a chance to participate in any battles. Their service was often omitted from local and state honor rolls. A large number of New Hampshire men and women died of disease and those who are not already credited to a specific town article on this blog will be included here Continue reading

New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Groton

Old Postcard Greeting from Groton NH. Property of J.W. Brown.

Groton is a small, bucolic town in Grafton County New Hampshire that includes the village of North Groton. Groton had about 250+ permanent residents during the WWI era (ranging from 319 people in 1910 to 199 by 1920). Of these less than 2% percentage of their population was sent to service (this was not unusual among the smallest towns, and really the majority of NH towns provided the same amount). Not all the young men who left for military service would return–Napoleon Houle and Fred Arthur Marshall being two.

My personal thanks to Elizabeth Jesperson of the Groton Cemetery Committee, and Kathy Sobetzer of the Groton Historical Society for going above and beyond to help me to write this article.  In addition Elizabeth graciously provided some of the photographs you see here. Continue reading