New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Lincoln

Photograph of World War I and World War II men who served from Lincoln NH. Courtesy Richard S. Marsh, used with permission.

The town of Lincoln, Grafton County, New Hampshire lies nestled in the White Mountain National Forest area, with much of the town within the Forest. Between 1910 and 1920 there were about 1,200 year-round residents.

If the town WWI honor roll is correct, about 51 local residents (all men) went into service during that war. On 4 July 1976 during the United State’s bicentennial celebration, the Town of Lincoln NH, in cooperation of the New England Pulp and Paper Corp., dedicated Bicentennial Park. This park is located at 121 Main Street in Lincoln not far from the entrance to Loon Mountain.

 

The following is a transcription of the Lincoln NH World War I monument. The comments in [ ] brackets are not on the original monument, and are my notations about their service].

FOR THOSE WHO SERVED IN WORLD WAR I and II

WORLD WAR I
/1ST COLUMN/
ALBERT, FRANK
BEAUDIN, PETER
BOWLES, FRANK J.
BOYLE, FRANCIS L.
BROOKS, HERBERT O.
BURNELL, FRANK J.
BURNELL, MILO S. [Pvt, HQ Co. 103rd Infantry, served in Europe 1917-1919]
CHASE, E.S.
CYR, JOSEPH E.
DEACHMAN, WILLIAM J.
DOHERTY, HENRY C.
FARWELL, HOWARD C.
FERGUSON, THOMAS A
/2ND COLUMN/
FILLION, JOSEPH
GROUT, ELWIN [Pvt. 34th Infantry, served in Europe]
GROUT, GEORGE C.
HENRY, JAMES E.
JESSEMAN, WILLIAM J.
JOHNSON, BERNARD C. [“Bernie” P1C, Co K, 103rd Infantry, served in Europe]
JOHNSON, FORREST L.
KNUKSHIA, JOHN
LABRECQUE, WILLIAM
LANDRY, FRANK J. [P1C, 8th Co., 20th Engineers (FOR), served in Europe]
LEONARD, JOHN A.
LEVERIDGE, ERNEST R. [Pvt, Co K, 305th Infantry, served in Europe]
MACDONALD, GEORGE A.
/3RD COLUMN/
MACDONALD, DANIEL M. [Pvt, Co. A, 33rd Engineers, served in Europe]
MAGUIRE, JAMES E.
MCGEE, JOHN L.
MCISAAC, HECTOR
MOORE, FRANK R.
MULLEN, HARRY [Corporal, 32nd PWE Infantry; served in Europe].
O’ROURKE, DANIEL
OUILLETT, WILFRED
OUILLETT, JOSEPH
PERRY, EDWARD i.
PIUDOKS, C.B.
RICE, LORON
SCOTT, CHARLES S.
/4TH COLUMN/
SCOTT, WALTER W.
SIDNEY, WALTER E.
SINKIEWICZ, JOSEPH C. [Pvt, Co. L, 18th Infantry, served in Europe]
STANLEY, RICHARD B.
TEMPLE, C. RAY [Christopher R. Temple, Pvt, T.A., 302 Trench Mortar Battery, served in Europe]
TEMPLE, HUGH J.
TEMPLE, JAMES C.
THERIAULT, CYRIL
WAITE, WALTER
*WHATLEY, IKE [Pvt, 807th Pioneer, Infantry, served in Europe]
WELLER, FRED C. [Pvt, Co. C, 103rd Infantry, served in Europe]
WILSKY, ALEX [Pvt, 102nd Infantry, served in Europe]

Some of the soldiers did not return from the war, and not all of those associated with the town were included on the town’s honor roll.

✫★✫★✫★✫★✪🌟✪✫★✫★✫★✫★
Heroes of LINCOLN NH
Died During WWI

✫★✫★✫★✫★✪🌟✪✫★✫★✫★✫★

Harold George Glass | P1C | Died of Accident 9 April 1919, France | Co B 317th Field Signal Battalion | Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Brooklyn NY | Credited to Lincoln NH and Union City NJ | [1]

Joseph Roleau Jr. | Private | Died 20 Oct 1918, France  | Co. C,  309th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry | Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery | N.H. Adjutant General Credits to Lincoln NH, should be Somersworth | [SEE story in Heroes of Somersworth]

Ike “Ed” Whatley | Private | Died of Disease 1 October 1918, France | 807th Pioneer Infantry | Jacksonville City Cemetery, Jacksonville Alabama | [2]

✫★✫★✫★✫★✪🌟✪✫★✫★✫★✫★
[1] Harold George Glass was born 10 Sep 1884 Brooklyn NY [Editor’s Note, on his WWI Registration card it should show 1894 nor 1884 as he was age 22 in 1917 and other records corroborate 1894]. He was the son of William & Matilda L. Glass. In 1900 he was living in Brooklyn NY with his parents. By 1910 his father had died and his mother had moved to New Jersey.  In WWI Draft Registration of 5 June 1917, Harold G. Glass was living on 83 Church Street in Lincoln NH. He was working in finishing room, paper mill,

National Cemetery Interment Card for Harold Glass.

Henry Paper Co. Lincoln NH. He had previously served 3 years in the U.S. Navy, was single and supporting his mother.  He was of medium height and build with gray eyes and black hair.  On 9 Jul 1918 he was a Private1C/Cook in Co B, 317th Field Signal Battalion being sent to Europe on the ship, America. His next of kin was his mother, Matilda Glass of Union Hill, N J.  Records show that he died of Accident or Other Cause (not in battle nor of disease) in France on 9 April 1919.  When the war ended, his remains were returned to the United States, and he was reburied in Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Brooklyn NY.  In the meantime his mother lived in and near Keyport, New Jersey and joined the American Legion Auxiliary there, qualifying as a Gold Star Mother.  In 1927 the local American Legion held a flag raising ceremony in her front yard to honor her son’s service.  She died there 5 February 1942.  Harold G. Glass’ name is not listed on the local Lincoln honor roll, but his name does appear on the New Hampshire Honor Roll in Doric Hall of the State House.

Joseph Roleau Jr.  [SEE story in Heroes of Somersworth]

[2] Ike “Ed” Whatley/Watley was born 22 Feb 1889 in Jacksonville Alabama, son of George & Nancy (Weaver) Whatley. He had siblings, Clint, Harriet, Edd and Purcey. In June of 1917 when he completed his WWI Registration Form, ‘Ike Watley’ was a single, black man living on Pollard Road in Lincoln NH employed as a teamster by C.B. Henry of Lincoln. He was of medium height, slender with black eyes and black hair.  During WWI he served in Co. D 807th Pioneer Infantry (an African-American segregated unit that served under the French flag.  He died of Disease on 1 October 1918, in France. When the war ended his remains were returned to the United States, where he was reburied in Jacksonville City Cemetery.   The town of Lincoln created a special memorial for Ike Whatley, but in 2017 the Cemetery Trustees were going to be moving it.  Ike Whatley’s name is inscribed on the Honor Roll in Doric Hall of the New Hampshire State House.


[Editor’s Note: this story is part of an on-going series about heroic New Hampshire men and women of World War I.  Look here for the entire listing].

 

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One Response to New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Lincoln

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