The Horrible History of 4th of July Accidents from New Hampshire Newspapers

Coloured Japanese Prints of Fireworks manufactured by Messrs Hirayama of Yokohama; From book, Pyrotechnics, the history and art of firework making, by Brock, Alan St. Hil, 1922

Coloured Japanese Prints of Fireworks manufactured by Messrs Hirayama of Yokohama; From book, Pyrotechnics, the history and art of firework making, by Brock, Alan St. Hil, 1922

As long as there has been fireworks, human beings have been injured by them. In the early days of Americas celebration of the Fourth of July, multiple injuries have occurred on or around a day that should be one of happiness. New York City seemed to have the worst of the deaths and dismemberments, but New Hampshire was not accident free.  These stories speak for themselves.

Salem, (Mass.) July 7, 1823; Afflicting Accident.–On Friday evening last, during the brilliant exhibition of fireworks on Washington Square, prepared in honor of our National Jubilee, a disastrous event occurred, which marred the pleasures inspired by the occasion,–and has spread gloom over the town.–When the exhibition was about half completed, over 300 rockets which were in a chest under the stage, were accidentally set fire to, and being in a horizontal position, many of them took a direction immediately towards the immense assembly of spectators, spreading terror, alarm and confusion among them, and melancholy to add, wounding and maiming about thirty persons,l–several of them dangerously,–and three of whom have since died. Continue reading