The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Seventeen

This is the continuation of a series of stories about men who died in World War 1, and whose photographs appeared in a publication called “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor.” The original post and explanation can be found at this link.  There will also be a complete listing of all the names researched at that same blog post.

LOST FACES OF WORLD WAR ONE: Our Nation’s Roll of Honor — Part Seventeen


MONTGALL Rufus Kansas City MOCAPTAIN RUFUS F. MONTGALL
Kansas City, Missouri
Killed in Action

Rufus Ford Montgall was born July 20, 1887 at St. Louis Missouri, son of William H. and Sarah E. “Sallie” (Ford) Montgall. According to “The Soldier from Independence: A Military Biography of Harry Truman,” by D.M. Giangreco, page 90, Rufus F. Montgall was “Truman’s second cousin on his father’s side.”

Rufus F. Montgall  attended local schools, and graduated in 1910 from the University of Pennsylvania.  The school’s catalog of that year shows the following activities: 1910 University of Pennsylvania Catalog. Rufus Ford Montgall. Phi Delta Theta (1) honor comm; (1) track; Vice President and Sales Manager American Sash and Door Co.; mem. Mid-Day, Country and Kansas City Athletic Clubs. Am Sash and Door Co. and “Rockhill Manor,” 43d and Locust Sts. Kansas City, Mo.

When he filled out his June 5, 1917 WW1 Draft Registration form, he noted that he was a member of the Officers Reserve Corps.  He was sent overseas, as part of the Quartermaster’s Corps. Supplies were essential to the American troops, and this Corps had been preparing to assault Cantigny. Capt. Montgall  was at Chaumont during the air raid. Continue reading

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Sanbornton New Hampshire Farmer: Thomas T. Cawley, Jr. (1789-1869)

Thomas T. Cawley Jr. of Sanbornton NH

Thomas T. Cawley Jr. of Sanbornton NH

Looking very much like a Yankee farmer, Thomas T. Cawley, Jr. peers out from the photograph.  He is elderly, white haired, and grizzled by the time this photograph was taken at B.N. Poor, Pike’s Block in Franklin, New Hampshire.

His father Jonathan Cawley had been the first to settle in Sanbornton, New Hampshire, on Lot No. 31, 2nd Division “near the Cawley Pond, which received from him its name.”  Thomas T. Cawley, Jr.  lived first on a farm given to him by his father, at the north end of Lot No. 28, 2d Division, afterwards the Ede Taylor place (near Sites) until 1830, then he bought the Daniel Tilton farm near the school-house of Dist. No. 8 which had been mortgaged to the Exeter Academy.  He lived there until his death.  He raised his family in the same town where he was born and died, and is buried with several generations of Cawley’s in the Cawley Pond Cemetery, in Sanbornton, NH. Continue reading

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The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Sixteen

This is the continuation of a series of stories about men who died in World War 1, and whose photographs appeared in a publication called “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor.” The original post and explanation can be found at this link.  There will also be a complete listing of all the names researched at that same blog post.

LOST FACES OF WORLD WAR ONE: Our Nation’s Roll of Honor — Part Sixteen


MEYERS Samuel Lancaster PACORPORAL SAMUEL W. MYERS
Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Died of Wounds

Samuel William Myers was born 22 Nov 1895 in  Lancaster PA, the son and only child of Samuel & Mary (Schmitt) Myers, and grandson of Philip & Barbara (Kohler) Schmitt.  Samuel’s mother married 2d) to Albert Mallgraf.   In 1915 Samuel W. Myers married Agnes McFalls, and in the same year had a daughter, Gladys Myers who died at the age of 1.

. Hip, Hip, Hooray!. [, Monographic. ,,:, 1917] Notated Music. Retrieved from the Library of Congress,

. Hip, Hip, Hooray!. [, Monographic,  1917] Notated Music. Retrieved from the Library of Congress.

Samuel W. Myers enlisted in the regular army at Ft. Slocum NY on 28 March 1917.  He was assigned to Co. A 23rd Infantry, and designated the rank of Private. He was promoted to Pvt 1cl on 1 Sep 1917, and then to Corporal on 5 Sep 1917. He was overseas from 7 Sep 1917 until his death.

Corporal Samuel William Myers died 8 June 1918 of wounds received in action. Though probably originally buried in France, his body was returned to the United States and his remains lie in Greenwood Cemetery, Lancaster PA.

Continue reading

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New Hampshire Tidbits: The Dirty Secret of Colonial Floors

SweepingThe earliest buildings of New Hampshire had dirt floors. Once they had evolved to wood flooring, the problem arose of how to keep them clean. Rugs and even coarse wool druggets were rare in those early colonial days.

Today we take for granted that we have vacuum cleaners, electric floor washers and steamers. So how did colonial women keep their floors clean? SAND. Yes, you read it correctly SAND. There were, of course, those who did not have access to sand who used hay, herbs, rushes or other natural grasses. But when it was available, SAND was often the choice. At some point the sand could be swept out and replaced with fresh, and the cost was negligible. Continue reading

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The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Fifteen

This is the continuation of a series of stories about men who died in World War 1, and whose photographs appeared in a publication called “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor.” The original post and explanation can be found at this link.  There will also be a complete listing of all the names researched at that same blog post.

LOST FACES OF WORLD WAR ONE: Our Nation’s Roll of Honor — Part Fifteen


MALONE Frank E Horeb WISPRIVATE FRANK E. MALONE
Horeb, Wisconsin
Died of Wounds

Frank Elmer Malone, was born 17 March 1892 in Springdale, Wisconsin, son of William A. & Caroline (Ottenberg) Malone. He had one sibling, a brother Alva.  His was a farming family.  At the time of filling out his WW1 Registration form, he was unemployed.Malone Frank 1918 newspaper notice

According to the local newspaper, “he enlisted in Madison July 23, 1917, and was assigned to the Milwaukee company E, first regiment, but was later transferred to Company I, 128th infantry, from which company he sailed to France. From Madison, Wisconsin he had previously been sent to Camp Douglas and about a month later was transferred to Camp MacArthur, Waco, Texas.Continue reading

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