Korean War Casualty, POW at Battle of Unsan: Swanzey NH’s Reginald Ernest Frazier (1932-1951)

POWHe paid the ultimate price. While still a boy at age 18, he enlisted with the U.S. Army in April of 1850, and arrived in Korea in August of the same year [per Sentinel newspaper article]. He was taken prisoner in the Battle of Unsan, in November 1950, and died while in captivity, 31 March 1951. His remains have not been recovered.

Reginald Ernest Frazier, son of Ernest & Leona A. (Rice) Frazier, was born. 23 August 1932 in the still small town of Swanzey NH, and died 31 March 1951. A centograph exists in Mountain View Cemetery of Swanzey that reads: In Memory Of Reginald E. Frazier, Died in Korea, 1951, Age 18. Continue reading

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New Hampshire’s FLAG DAY 2016

1776 Flag

1776 Flag

Flag day is under-celebrated in New Hampshire, and many people have no clue of the day’s origin.   Absent of parades and speeches, today’s celebration happens quietly, mostly in classrooms.  So what is the big deal about Flag Day?

In essence, our flag is a piece of cloth which we have the right to fly should we wish to, but we also have the right to burn it.  What an amazing country we live in that we have those rights. To many the American flag is a symbol of sacrifice.  From the date of its creation, how many of our soldiers have rallied around it, fallen on the battlefield beneath it, celebrated victories with the flag clutched in their hands, and saluted it with pride on occasions of both celebration and sorrow?  Continue reading

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Civil War Casualty of Gettysburg, Former News Reporter, Lancaster NH’s Famed Col. Edward E. Cross (1832-1863)

Edward E Cross

Edward E.  Cross was born into a military family in the town of Lancaster, Coos County, New Hampshire, the son of  Ephraim E. & Abigail C. (Everett) Cross. Much has been written about this man, who in his own hand writing noted , “My life–all I have–is at the service of the country.” I will try not to repeat much of what has already been said, and hopefully you will find his story interesting, for he was anything but boring.

Edward’s father was a hatter by profession, but also a senator, postmaster, tavern owner, and colonel in the local militia. Edward attended the local common schools, and at the age of 15 went to learn the printer’s trade. He then helped his father in steamboat building in Canada and visited the principal cities there.

Continue reading

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The Lost Faces of World War One — Part Four

This is the continuation of a series of stories about men who died in World War 1, and whose photographs appeared in a publication called “Our Nation’s Roll of Honor.” The original post and explanation can be found at this link.  There will also be a complete listing of all the names researched at that same blog post.

LOST FACES OF WORLD WAR ONE: Our Nation’s Roll of Honor — Part Four


 

CAPPS Calvin Lucama NCLieut. Calvin Capps
Lucama, North Carolina
Died of Wounds

Calvin Leroy Capps was born 5 March 1892 Wilson County, North Carolina [per ww1 draft registration], son of George Matthew & Margaret K. “Maggie” (Phillips) Capps. In 1900 living in Black River, Cumberland, North Carolina with his mother Maggie 27, and brothers Edward F. (6), Carl W. (4) and George F. (2).

He was a 2nd Lieutenant, 74th Co., 6 Reg., U.S.M.C. and died 12 June 1918 of wounds he received in battle.  He is buried in Plot B Row 11 Grave 45, Aisne-Marne American Cemetery, Belleau, France. His life was mentioned several times in newspaper articles, and so I let those speak for themselves. Continue reading

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WW2 Captured at Bataan, Philippines, Died A POW: Somersworth New Hampshire’s Lt. Col. Joseph Albert Sullivan (1895-1942)

Lieut. Col. Joseph Albert Sullivan (1895-1942)

Lieut. Col. Joseph Albert Sullivan (1895-1942)

Joseph Albert Sullivan was born in Somersworth, Strafford County, New Hampshire in 1895 to Dennis & Lizzie (Casey) Sullivan. His father worked as a barber, and his grandparents on both sides were Irish.

He grew up and attended school in the towns of Somersworth and Dover, and graduated from New Hampshire State College (now UNH) in 1916, with an agricultural degree. His college yearbook shows he went by the nickname “Joe,” played football in his first two years, was range officer and captain of the school’s cadet program in his 3rd year, and student council president and a member of the dramatic club in his 4th year. Continue reading

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