Clairvoyant and Treasure Hunter of Lebanon New Hampshire: Nellie M. (Lewis) Titus (1864-1957)

Photograph of Mrs. Nellie Titus from
a 1905 Boston Sunday Globe
newspaper.

I am not writing this story to dispute whether clairvoyants exist, nor to argue whether Mrs. Nellie M. (Lewis) Titus of Lebanon New Hampshire was gifted or not with psychic visions. What I do know is that Mrs. Titus was an interesting, eccentric woman.  She was in the public eye several times as she claimed to see what others could not while in a  trance–a drowning victim, a murder scene, and buried treasure. That she led an intriguing life and she spent most of her time in New Hampshire qualifies her for a story here.

Pulitzer Prize winner Deborah Blum mentions Mrs. Titus in her book “Ghost Hunters: William James and the Search for Scientific Proof of Life after Deathpublished in 2006. She says that William James of the Society for Psychical Research, a Harvard College philosopher and psychologist, reported on Mrs. Titus ‘seership.’ As a result of Mrs. Titus’ search for the body of Bertha Huse in New Hampshire’s Mascoma Lake (as mentioned later),  William James reportedly  concluded that “my own view of the Titus case consequently is that it is a decidedly solid document in favor of the admission of a supernatural faculty of seership.”[See full report in the Proceedings of the American Society For Psychical Research]. Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Heroes of Greenville

Bird’s Eye view of Greenville NH, from an old
postcard owned by Janice W Brown.

On April 6, 1917, the U.S. joined its allies– France, Britain, and Russia–to fight in the World War (WWI). The citizens of Greenville, New Hampshire were quick to do their part. By June of 1917 events had already been held to benefit the Red Cross. Knitted and sewn articles for the military recruits were being prepared and the selectmen’s room was open to receive them. Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: A Tale of Two Castonguay

Two sons of New Hampshire with the surname Castonguay served during WWI in the Canadian Army. They died in service 3 days apart. Their names are engraved on New Hampshire’s Roll of Honor in Doric Hall of the New Hampshire State House.  These are their stories. Continue reading

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New Hampshire WWI Military: Harry Frank Baker of Orford

It’s difficult to write about a hero when the evidence is lean. The town of Orford in Grafton County New Hampshire today has a little over 1,2000 residents. When World War I was announced it had about 800. Though small, the town contributed its share.  Some who served include (list not complete): Edward Carr, Roland E. Downing, Leonor A. Field, Parker E. Foote, Samuel Roswell Morrison, Wesley Newton Robie, Fay F. Russell, Ray Namon Streeter, Frank W. Swett, Joseph Allen Thompson, and Harvey L. Washburn. Continue reading

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New Hampshire’s First Cattle: Captain Mason’s Yellow Cowes

June 1st is World Milk Day and this is National Dairy Month, so it’s the perfect day to write about cows and cattle. It is also time for a confession of sorts–the black and white Holstein cow that I have displayed for 12 years on the Cow Hampshire banner is not historically correct.

Today Holstein cattle are most quickly recognized and cows of Holstein descent make up over 90% of the cows on U.S. dairy farms. But New Hampshire’s earliest cows were not Holsteins.
Continue reading

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