Still More Manchester (NH) High School Graduates of 1888 and 1890

Some of the Manchester schools of 1890 including the High School that these students graduated from.  Sketches from the 1890 Report of Manchester NH Selectmen

Some of the Manchester schools of 1890 including the High School (upper middle drawing) that these students graduated from. Sketches from the 1890 Report of Manchester NH Selectmen

Today I finish my presentation of photographs and partial genealogies of members of the Manchester (New Hampshire) High School graduating class of 1888 and 1890.  All members of the 1888 Manchester High School graduating class was noted in the 1888 Manchester Annual Report, under the School’s Superintendent’s section. There were a few of the graduates I have not reported on because I do not have their photographs.

Group Portrait—Manchester High School 25th Reunion Class of 1889-90 [taken 8 September 1915].  G. I. Hopkins; Arthur Wheat; Tommy Morse; Mattie Chadwick (Hobbs); Ellen Brown; May Morse; Grace Smith; Cora Simmons; Bertha Young; Ethel Lauiprey; [Vennie] Bartlett; [Mertie] Hawkes (Preston); Sarah Price; Hattie Willard; May (Saxon); William Heath; Dick Hobbs; Will Saxon; [Norwise] Bean; Mrs. Bean; Margaret Manning; Mrs. Fay S. Manning; Edith Burnhaus; with other husbands and children of classmates. From the Manchester Historic Association Collection. Used with permission.

Group Portrait—Manchester High School 25th Reunion Class of 1889-90 [taken 8 September 1915]. G. I. Hopkins; Arthur Wheat; Tommy Morse; Mattie Chadwick (Hobbs); Ellen Brown; May Morse; Grace Smith; Cora Simmons; Bertha Young; Ethel Lauiprey; [Vennie] Bartlett; [Mertie] Hawkes (Preston); Sarah Price; Hattie Willard; May (Saxon); William Heath; Dick Hobbs; Will Saxon; [Norwise] Bean; Mrs. Bean; Margaret Manning; Mrs. Fay S. Manning; Edith Burnhaus; with other husbands and children of classmates. From the Manchester Historic Association Collection. Used with permission.

Twice previously I have posted photographs and genealogies about members of this same graduating class, i.e.:
Four Manchester (NH) High School Graduates of 1888: George W. Bartlett, Lillian J. Gray, Emma A. Putney, John B. McGuinness
Four More Manchester (NH) High School Graduates 1888:  Maude G. Fifield, Ethel G. Lamprey, Sarah G. “Sadie” Sawyer, Alice M. Stuart

Today’s post will include stories about: 1888 Class graduates: Warner Mitchell Allen, Ernest Augustus Royal, Mabel J. Brickett, Clara Ellen Brown, Annie Belle Goodwin, Seddie  J. Berry, Mary Augusta Hawley; and 1890 Class graduate: Mattie Sophronia Chadwick.

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New Hampshire Tidbits: The Song “My Old New Hampshire Home”

My Old New Hampshire Home, Historical American Sheet Music, Duke University Library, Digital Collection

My Old New Hampshire Home, Historical American Sheet Music, Duke University Library, Digital Collection

 

Considered a sentimental ballad, the tune “My Old New Hampshire Home,” was composed by Harry Von Tilzer, and lyricist Andrew B. Sterling in 1898. Neither of these two men were from New Hampshire, though they were intimately connected with the New England vaudeville shows.

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The Face of Vera Althea Tryon aka Mrs. Harold M. Walker of Manchester NH (1892-1942)

An undated photograph of Vera Althea Tryon, probably taken at her 8th grade graduation circa xxxx in Manchester NH.

An undated photograph of Vera Althea Tryon, probably taken at her 8th grade graduation circa 1905 in Manchester NH.

Vera Althea Tryon stands frozen in time, with her hands clasped delicately around a diploma.  She wears a white, ruffled summer dress.  Her hair is pulled back, and tied with a large white silk bow. She wears elbow high white gloves.  Around her throat she wears a cameo necklace. Her clothing and accessories are typical at the turn of the 20th century.

This is probably a formal photograph of Vera’s eighth grade graduation (taken about 1905 when she would have been 13 years old) in Manchester, New Hampshire.  She grew up at 96 A Street where her family was still living in 1910. Continue reading

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Photographer Charles Henry Shaw of Manchester, New Hampshire (1864-1932)

Shaws Studio bannerFrom 1897 to 1927, a span of thirty years, Charles Henry Shaw photographed the people of Manchester.  His studio for most of that time was at 895 Elm Street, though briefly it was also located at 68 Opera Block. Charles and his wife Ida (Doughty) Shaw lived in the city and raised their children while they lived on 510 Maple and 73 Malvern Streets.  When their children grew and moved away, they spent the rest of their lives at 219 Walnut Street.  Continue reading

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Manchester NH’s Wagner Memorial Park aka Pretty Park

Photograph of Edward Wagner, father of Ottilie (Wagner) Hosser, for whom  (along with his wife, Wilhelmina) the park was originally dedicated, and   where it gets its name.

Photograph of Edward Wagner, father of Ottilie (Wagner) Hosser, for whom (along with his wife, Wilhelmina) Wagner Memorial Park in Manchester NH was originally dedicated, and from whom it derives its name. From The Mirror’s Pictorial Manchester 1846-1896.

Wagner Memorial Park is a well-landscaped park with a Greek-revival monument and benches, located in the Arts & Cultural District of Manchester, New Hampshire. The park was created on an entire block of land (one and one-half acres) located between Prospect, Myrtle, Maple and Oak Streets. Before it became a park it was part of a larger farm belonging to the Weston Family.

The land was given to the city by Ottilie “Matilda” (Wagner) Hosser to honor her parents, Edward & Wilhelmina (Seelig) Wagner. According to a history article written in 2012 by Aurore Eaton, and published in the Union Leader newspaper, when Ottilie died in 1944 her will offered the land to the city along with $150,000 to build a memorial park to her parents that would be a place of “peace and love,” a reminder of the friendship between the German American people. Aurore notes in her article, “Understandably, the city was reluctant to make these feelings known while the park was being constructed in 1944 and 1945, in the middle of World War II.”

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