Portsmouth NH Navy Yard: Genealogy Gleanings from the Life Buoy

The Industrial Department Life Buoy was a magazine issued free, on a monthly basis, to Lifebuoyemployees of the Industrial Department of the Portsmouth Navy Yard, in Portsmouth New Hampshire. It was intended to inspire, to give a sense of collective purpose, and to provide news as one might share within a family.

This particular collection of magazines published from 1917 to 1920 contains important historical and biographical information, the excerpts of which I will provide here, with links back to the original text. Anyone with a relative who worked at the shipyard during this time, or who has an interest in submarine and ship building in the World War I era will find the information fascinating.

Each of the Portsmouth Shipyard shops had their own segment within the magazine, and announcements specific to their departments. The Navy Yard had a baseball team, and a band, both of which were mentioned several times but not often included in my gleanings here. These magazines also contained a wide variety of advertising for local businesses and services, for those who are researching business owners.

——–GLEANINGS——-

3 April 1918 retirement of Mr. Luke Ashworth, Master Shipsmith. Trained in Delaware Bay shipyards, superintendant of forge shop in Cleveland Ohio. Boston Navy Yard.

Photograph: Liberty Loan Parade, May 1918

Photograph: At the Christening of the Submarine 0-1

Samuel D. Gilley

Samuel D. Gilley

Photograph: Samuel D. Gilley, Master Steamfitter. He was born 4 April 1868 in Houlton, Maine, moved with family to Michigan. Apprenticed at F.W. Wheeler and Co. of Bay City Michigan (tugboats and freight boats). In 1898 worked for the Harlan and Hollingsworth Co. of Wilmington DE, and later with the New York Shipbuilding Co. of Camden NJ. From 1902-1906 was inspector for the Navy Dept. In 1906 appointed Master Ship-fitter at the Portsmouth Navy Yard.

August Ham

August Ham

Photograph: August Ham, longest working employee. He was born in Portsmouth NH on 3 September 1853. In 1918 he was in charge of linoleum and the placing on vessels.

Photograph: Submarine 0-1 Launched 9 July 1918 [detailed story]

Kaisar Wilhelm cartoon

Claude C. GilliamArticle: “Why We Are Fighting Germany,” by Franklin K. Lane, Secretary of the Interior

Photograph: Claude C. Gilliam, Quarterman Electrical worker, noting his passing.

Charles E. Marshall

Charles E. Marshall

 

Photograph: Charles R. Marshall, Acting Foreman of the Machine Shop.

Photograph and Biography: Commander Ross P. Schlabach,

Commander R P Schlabach

Commander R P Schlabach

USN was born in Wadsworth, Ohio 22 July 1881. In 1899 he was appointed to the Naval Academy at Annapolis and graduated in February 1902. In April 1902 he entered Massachusetts Institute of Technology and graduated 1905. While there, on 28 July 1903 he was appointed Assistant Naval Constructor and on 8 July 1911 Naval Contractor. During the years 1905 to 1908 Naval Constructor Schlabach was assigned to the Navy Yard, Norfolk VA; during 1908 to 1913, Navy Yard, Charleston SC; during 1913 to 1915 Inspector of the Hull Material, USN, Pittsburg PA and from 1915 to 1918 Navy Yard Portsmouth NH.

 

WSS Booth, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard

WSS Booth, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard

Photograph and Description: A War Savings Stamp (W.S.S.) Booth, with a unique design placed at the east corner of the Spar Shop, to allow employees to purchase these stamps.

 

 

Albert S. Spinney

Albert S. Spinney

Photograph and biography: Albert S. Spinney, Master Machinist. He was born in South Eliot Maine on 10 June 1871 and grew up there. In 1889 he became an apprentice at the Portsmouth Machine Co. remaining there for 5 years. In 1894 he worked for the Davidson Ventilating Fan Co and later the Massachusetts Ventilating Co. of Cambridgeport MA, installing ventilation systems in plants throughout the country. In January 1910 he was appointed a Leadingman machinist at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, then transferred to the Engineer’s Office as Estimator and Planner. Later her was made Foreman of the Machine (Electrical) Shop. He is married and has three children, and is living at No. 419 Richards Ave, Portsmouth NH.
Photograph and biography:

Lieutenant Commander Ryden

Lieutenant Commander Ryden

Lieut. Commander R.W. Ryden, was born in Des Moines Iowa on 27 Feb 1882. He was appointed to the Naval Academy, Annapolis MD from the state of Iowa and entered the Naval Academy on 11 September 1899, graduating in 1903. He served as Passed Midshipman and Ensign on the Battleship Maine, Gunboat, and Destroyer Truxtun. In Aug 1905 he was transferred to the Construction Corps. He was selected to take a special course at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he graduated in June of 1908. He was then assigned to the Portsmouth Navy Yard, where he remained until 1912. For 1-1/2 years he was the Office and Shop Superintendent at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Norfolk VA, followed by 2-1/2 years at the Olangapo Naval Station as Construction Officer. He had temporary duty in the Bureau of Construction and Repair, Washington DC. He assumed his duties as Shop Superintendent of the Portsmouth Navy Yard on 17 September 1918.

Carter’s Overalls Advertising. Lebanon NH

Frank Dennett

Frank Dennett

Photograph and Biography: Frank Dennett, Structural Shop Foreman. He was born in Buxton, Maine on 2 November 1869, living there until 17 years old. In 1886 he began his apprenticeship with Woodman and Robinson, contractors and builders at Westbrook, Maine, remaining four years. In 1890 he took charge of the woodworking department for Foster and Brown, paper machine manufacturers, remaining 8 years. He then went into general contracting work in Boston and vicinity for 3 years, as foreman for various contractors. He started work at the Portsmouth Ship Yard in 1902.

 

Driving the first rivet Submarine S-8 on 9 November 1918. The riveting gang was Driving the first rivetcomposed as follows: Capt. F.W.F. Wieber, Medical Corps, USN and Com. R.W. Ryden, Construction Corps USN were the riveters. Lieut. H.F. McCarthy (Construction Corps) USN was holder-on. Our Industrial Manager’s son Mr. Lawrence S. Adams was rivet passer. The rivet heater was Mr. Joseph Lebowski.

 

HISTORY OF THE US NAVY YARD, PORTSMOUTH NH (in four parts)
Part I History
Part II History
Part III History
Part IV History

List of Fraternal Organizations and Societies in Portsmouth and Kittery with officers: 1919
Elks, Foresters, Knights of Columbus, Knights of Pythias, Masons, Moose, Odd Fellows, Redmen, Modern Woodman of America, American Society of Marine Draftsmen

Photograph: Submarine S-3 Launched Practically Complete, on 21 December 1919

Charles F. DrakePhotograph and Biography: Mr. Charles Fabyan Drake has “Gone West.” Foreman of the Sheet Metal Shop was suddenly attacked by apoplexy and before he reached the Dispensary he had passed on to the other world from whence no man ever returns. Mr. Charles Fabyan Drake, the son of the late Fabyan P. and Elizabeth Elkins Drake was born in South Boston, Mass., February 18, 1874. At the age of 10 years his parents moved to Kittery, Maine where he resided ever since. At age 16 he began work at the Navy Yard as an apprentice plumber, quickly moving through the ranks.

Photograph and Biography: Charles A. Wendell, Foreman Shipwright. He died 14 Charles A. WendellDecember 1919. He first began work with the Navy Yard in 1861 as an apprentice and his first employment was on the Frigate Kearsarge, which was launched during the Civil War. For two years he was employed as a sparmaker at Young’s Spar Yard at Boston MA. In 1872 he returned to Portsmouth and accepted work in the Yard as an expert sparmaker, eventually being promoted to Foreman.

Fred F HayesPhotograph and Biography: Fred F. Hayes, Master Machinist. He was born in the city of Chicago IL on 4 May 1874 and grew up there. When about 13 years of age he moved with his family to Portsmouth NH, graduating from grammar and high schools here. He completed a three year mechanical engineering course at the New Hampshire State College at Durham NH. He began work at the Ship Yard on 6 May 1899, as a third-class machinist, working his way to Master Machinist (Afloat).

Cartoon: Accidents – Death, Injury, Trouble, Woe, Sorrow, Debt, etc.

Photograph: Driving the First Rivet, Submarine S-9 on 20 January 1919

Photograph and Biography: Lieut. (j.g.) Frederick G. Jackson, USNRF, graduated from

Lieutenant Jackson

Lieutenant Jackson

Harvard College in 1903. He studied advanced chemistry in the Harvard Graduate School and for a year in Germany. He taught chemistry for 3 years at Purdue and North Dakota Universities…He enlisted in the Naval Reserve on 18 March 1917 as a gunner’s mate, third class, attended Marblehead Training Station and was sent to the U.S.S. Parthenia, a steam yacht being converted for patrol duty. He obtained a transfer to the laboratory of the Boston Navy Yard. In Nov 1918 he was promoted to Lieutenant (j.g.) and on 21 Feb 1919 he was ordered to the Portsmouth Navy Yard.

Walter Laforest BallPhotograph and Biography: Walter LaForest Ball. Master Painter. He died 22 February 1919 at his home in Kittery, Maine. He was born at Somersworth NH 10 December 1855, the son of John R. and Mary Homans Ball. His family removed to Kittery in 1868 and that is where Mr. Ball received most of his education in the public schools. In 1871 he began service at the Portsmouth Navy Yard as a painter’s apprentice, working his way to Master Painter. He married August 1873 to Miss Ella F. Lewis, daughter of Joseph Lewis.

Photograph and Biography: Charles Jensen. Foreman Shipwright. Charles Jensen was

Charles Jensen

Charles Jensen

born in Washington DC 4 January 1884. He came to the Portsmouth Navy Yard in 1899 as an apprentice spar and block maker. When his apprenticeship ended in 1905 he was rated as a first class mechanic. In 1906 during the construction of the spars for the USS Constitution, Mr. Jensen, then 21 years old was appointed an acting Leadingman and served in that capacity until 1912. In 1916 he was made Quarterman, and after the death of Charles A. Wendell was promoted to Foreman

Eleanor Reich Humphreys

Eleanor Reich Humphreys

Shipwright.

 

Photograph and Wedding Announcment–Humphreys-Reich. Miss Eleanor W. Reich and Mr. Stewart S. Humphreys were married on March 16, 1919. Mr. Humphreys is one of the most popular stenographers in the Industrial Department [additional description not included here]

 

 

 

Photograph and Biography: Forrest C. Varrell, Acting Foreman Sheet Metal Shop
Forrest C. Varrell was born in Rye, NH 27 April 1873 and attended the public schools of

Forrest C Varrell

Forrest C Varrell

that town until 1892, when he entered the employ of W.E. Paul at Portsmouth NH as apprentice sheet metal worker, continuing with the firm ten years. In 1902 he accepted a call as sheet metal worker at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, working under the supervision of the late Charles F. Drake as mechanic, leadingman and quarterman. Since Mr. Drake’s death in December 1918 he has acted as Foreman.

James K. Boyle

James K. Boyle

Photograph and Biography: James K. Boyle, Foreman Joiner Shop. Mr. James K. Boyle, the Foreman Joiner, was born in Manchester, Massachusetts. He attended the public schools there, but at age 14 left to learn his trade. As a young man he was employed by Daniel Badger Company of Boston, furniture manufacturers remaining with them for 20 years rising to the position of superintendent of the factory. On 6 May 1901 Mr. Boyle was appointed Foreman Joiner at this Yard, as the result of competitive examination.

 

Photograph and Biography, Joseph T. Wait. He was born at Newport, England and

Joseph T. Waite

Joseph T. Waite

came to this country with his parents when 11 years of age. He was in action at the beginning of the Civil War, with a company from Lawrence MA, as the drummer boy for Company I, commanded by Captain Pickering…[more in original story not shown here]. Returning home he attended school for 3 years, recovering from wounds and at age 17 ran away from home again and enlisted in the US Navy at the Boston Navy Yard, assigned to the ship, Sakatian, then the Monongahela in time for the Battle of Mobile. He was discharged from the Navy in April 1865, and went west to work as a cowboy in Arizona. He returned home and became employed as superintendent of the Franklin Massachusetts woolen mills for ten years, and afterwards following his trade of belt-maker with the International Paper Company at Lawrence MA. He left that position to work in the Navy

Portsmouth Navy Yard Ambulance 1919

Portsmouth Navy Yard Ambulance 1919

Yard as belt-maker.

Photograph and brief description of Portsmouth Navy Yard Ambulance of 1919

 

G.E. Chaffee

G.E. Chaffee

Photograph and Biography: G.E. Chaffee, Master Shipsmith. He was born in Stafford CT and lived there during his early boyhood. At age 19 he entered the New York Central shops at Albany as an apprentice blacksmith. That completed the worked as a smith in the Locomotive Department, the Car Department and for 3 years as a special tool maker. In 1904 he entered the Smith Shop in the Boston Navy Yard as a tool maker, working there until 1906. From 1906-1912 he was employed at the Boston Yard as a general ship smith doing special work upon the manufacture of chain. After 9 years as a mechanic he was appointed to Quarterman, increasing in rating and responsibility. On 19 April 1918 he was transferred to the Portsmouth Navy Yard as Master Shipsmith.

Allan H. Robinson

Allan H. Robinson

Photograph and Biography: Allan H. Robinson. Chief Stenographer. On June 3 he left the Portsmouth Navy Yard to take a position as Chief Clerk at the Naval Station at San Diego, California. He came to the Portsmouth Navy Yard in 1902 as a stenographer in the Department of Yards and Docks when several departments consolidated and he became Chief Stenographer of the Industrial Department. He was there 17 years. He acted as Secretary of Portsmouth NH’s Sunset League.

Photograph and Story: Submarine S-4 Launched on 27 August 1919, christened by Mrs. Herbert S. Howard (she is in the photograph).

Portsmouth Navy Yard Baseball Team

Portsmouth Navy Yard Baseball Team

Photograph and Story: Baseball Team Captures Championship – Sunset League Winners. (Won 12, lost 2).
The team is composed of the following players in the order as they appear on the photograph: TOP row left to right: Hugelman, Mgr., Butler, 2nd base; Hayes, 1st base; Gannon 3rd base; Irvine, l.f.; Mastan, r.f. BOTTOM row left to right: Scruton p., Weare p., Crowell coach c f, Fontaine c., Davis c.f., Broderick utility infielder.

Joseph H. Morrill

Joseph H. Morrill

Photograph and Biography: Mr. Joseph H. Morrill, Master Painter. Mr. Morrill was born in Portsmouth NH 22 June 1866, graduating from the Haven Gramma School. At 15 years of age he went to work in the Ship Yard of Daniel Marcy, but left that in 1882 to work at the Isles of Shoals and remained there until 1884 as a general helper. In 1885 he went to Boston and learned the painter’s trade under Mr. N.T. Howard. From 1889 to 1914 he worked for various firms in Portsmouth as Foreman in charge. In September 1913 he was called to the Portsmouth Yard as a journeyman painter, and promoted to leading man in 1917, Quarterman in 1918 and became Acting Foreman on the death of Mr. Ball in February 22, 1919. He was appointed Master Painter Aug 27, 1919. Previous to working at the yard Mr. Morrill had charge of the work in some of the finest residences and buildings in Portsmouth, decorating and painting in such places as Wentworth and the Rockingham hotel, the Middle Street Baptist Church and the residences of (various people)….Mr. Morrill is married and has two children.

Robert GilkersPhotograph and Biography: Robert J. Gilker, Foreman Laborers & Riggers. Mr Gilker was born in New Carlisle, Quebec, August 9, 1874. After attending the grammar school, Mr. Gilker began work as a Shipfitter’s helper in the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine in 1893 and was advanced to the grade of Shipfitter in 1895. In 1901 Mr. Gilker left the Bath Iron Works to accept a position in Groton CT. He returned to the Bath Iron Works in 1903 and was made Foreman Shipfitter, serving until April 1912. From April to September 1912 he was with the Seattle Construction and Dry Dock Company as Assistant to the Manager. Mr. Gilker not only knows how to build boats but how to sail them, for he served as a boat steerer on the whaling ship, “Frances Allyn” from the port of New Bedford during the years of 1897 and 1898, and was once reported lost in the Arctic Ocean. In 1915 Mr. Gilker was appointed Foreman of the Laborers and Riggers Shop in the Portsmouth Navy yard.

 

Photograph and Biographies of “Five Old Timers” of the Portsmouth Ship Yard. Five old timers of Portsmouth ShipyardThey have a total of 146 years. FRONT row, left to right are George E. Hammond, Charles H. Farwell, and John W. Leavitt. BACK row left to right J. Howard Junkins and Aaron H. Brackett.
—Mr. Hammond was born in Eliot, Maine December 21, 1848 and graduated from the University of Maine in its first class of Civil Engineering. He was employed on the NY Central and Erie Railroads for 12 years. He entered Government service July 15, 1885 as clerk in the Department of Yards & Docks, leaving on July 15, 1889 and being reappointed July 15, 1893, being there ever since. Mr. Hammond raises prize cattle on his farm.
—Mr. Charles H. Farwell was born in Kennebunk Maine, April 30, 1855. He entered government service in May 1878 as a painter in the department of Yards & DOcks. He later served as clerk in the Ordnance Department, Steam Engineering Department, Construction and Repair Department and the Inspection Office. He is now Assistant to the Chief Clerk in the Industrial Department.
—Mr. John W. Leavitt was born in Exeter NH August 12, 1844. He attended public schools at Exeter and graduated from Exeter High School in 1861. He was service during the Civil War in a Massachusetts Regiment. He was appointed a clerk in the Supply Department in November 1889. He is a member of the G.A.R.
—Mr. J. Howard Junkins was born at York Maine October 1, 1849. He entered Government service June 1, 1889, was out of the service from 1893 to 1896 and was reappointed December 3, 1896 and had been in the Yard ever since. Mr. Junkins had never lost a day because of sickness until December 2, 1918. He is now a clerk in the Accounting Department. His hobby is gardening.
—Mr. Aaron H. Brackett was born in Acton Maine May 8, 1852. He entered the Goverment service July 8, 1893 as a messenger and has been at this Yard ever since, without the loss of a single day. Mr. Brackett is a checker enthusiast and enjoys a good game of pool.

John J. Connors

John J. Connors

Photograph and Biography: John J. Connors, Master Molder. He was born April 16, 1884 in Winchendon MA. He attended grammar schools and graduated from high school there. Mr. Connors served an apprenticeship wit the B.D. Whitney Company of Winchendon. He has had experience as a journeyman molder in iron, steel and brass work with the Vermont Snath Company, Springfield VT, Falther Foundry Company Nashua NH, Claremont and Chicago Plants of the Sullivan Machine Company, General Electric Company, Schenectady NY, Bangor Iron Works Bangor Maine, Bellows Falls Paper Machine Company, Force River Iron Works, Quincy. He was called on the Yard as Molder April 20, 1917 and was appointed Quarterman in charge August 26, 1917 and Foreman, February 14, 1918. Under Mr. Connor’s supervision are produced numerous articles of brass, iron and steel varying in size from the propeller hubs of cruisers to small articles for electrical equipment.

Rear Admiral Boush

Rear Admiral Boush

Photograph and Notice of Detachment: Rear Admiral C.J. Boush, U.S.N. Rear Admiral Clifford J. Boush, USN (Ret) stepped down as Commander of the Portsmouth Navy Yard on 16 October 1919.

 

H.F. Winrich

H.F. Winrich

Photograph and Death Notice of H.F. Windrich. His sudden death due to apoplexy on October 13, 1919 while he was returning from a day spent in the woods near the Rangeley Lakes. He was first employed on the Yard as a mechanic on May 26, 1898. On the 3 June 1909 he was promoted to a Leadingman machinist, holding that rating until August of 1919 when he was appointed planner and estimator. Previous to the Yard Mr. Windrich was engaged as an erecting engineer and for a number of years was engaged in setting up mining machinery in Mexico. He organized the Voluntary Fire Department of Kittery, Maine and ever since its inception has been Chief Engineer.

Photograph and description:  Laying the Keel of the Submarine S-10 on September 11, 1919.

Thomas Gamester

Thomas Gamester

Photograph and Biography: Thomas Gamester, Foreman Boilermaker. Mr. Gamester was born in New Haven CT 1882. He graduated from the grammar school there, then served an apprenticeship of four years in the New Haven Railroad shops. After some experience in this work, he went to the Boston Navy Yard as Boilermaker, advancing to Leadingman, and after competitive examination to Master Boilermaker of the yard, appointed in October 1908. He is married and has 5 sons.

John D. Medcalf

John D. Medcalf

Photograph and Biography: John D. Medcalf. Foreman of the Pattern Shop. He was born in Brooklyn NY and moved to Kittery Maine during the fall of 1866. Two years later he reported and went to work as apprentice joiner in the C & R Department of the Portsmouth Navy yard. He completed his apprentice ship April 8, 1874. In 1878 he left the Yard but returned as a second-class joiner under Foreman S.H. Pillsbury. In 1881 he left the Yard and went to work with the Portsmouth Machine Company, then to the South Boston Machine Company. Early in 1895 he returned to the Portsmouth yard and worked 5 years as first-class pattern-maker. After the death of Foreman Pilsbury he took examination for the position of Quarterman Pattern Maker in charge, receiving the appointment in 1905. He was promoted to Foreman Pattern Maker in 1916.

 

George M. Johnson

George M. Johnson

Photograph and Biography: George M. Johnson, Quarterman Molder. He is in charge of the Smelting Plant. Born the 6 October 1885 in Kittery, Maine. He attended the public schools of Kittery and in March 1902 he came to the Portsmouth Navy Yard as an apprentice molder, completing his apprenticeship in 1906. In 1908 he spent 2 months at the Biddeford Iron Works then returned to the Yard Foundry where he was rated a first class mechanic. He acted as leadingman for 2 years from 1914 to 1916, when he was appointed Leadingman in charge of the Smelting Plant and Quarterman in charge of December 1916.

John H. Rose

John H. Rose

Photograph and Biography: John H. Rose, Yardmaster. He was born in Portsmouth NH January 22, 1859 and attended the grammar schools of the city. He served an apprenticeship as machinist on the old Eastern Railroad, later a part of the Boston and Maine system and remained there 25 years. For 15 years he served as Foreman of the wrecking train. He was called to the yard as machinist in 1900 and put in charge of the railroad in 1902. On January 1, 1917 he was made Yardmaster, in charge of all teams, motor trucks, traveling cranes and all material moved on the railroad, and responsible for maintenance of all truckage in the Yard. Baseball is Mr. Rose’s hobby.

Alexander Halstead

Alexander Halstead

Photograph and Biography of Rear Admiral Alexander Seaman Halstead, Commandant Portsmouth Navy Yard. Position assume December 1, 1919. He was born 17 December 1861 at Philadelphia PA. He was appointed to Annapolis on October 1, 1879 and graduated in June 1883. He served in the Engineering Corps until 1899 when he was appointed Lieutenant. He served during the Spanish War as an officer on the USS Raleigh and was with Admiral Dewey at the time of the Battle of Manila Bay. He was also under fire in subsequent engagements that took place in the vicinity of Manila. During the year 1909 he was Equipment Officer at Mare Island, California. During the years 1909 and 1910 he was in command of the USS Vicksburg, and was off the west coast of Central America. During the years 1911 and 1912 Rear Admiral Halstead was in command of the USS West Virginia while during the years 1912 and 1913 he was in command of the cruiser California, which later became the San Diego. During 1913 and 1914 he was a member of the Board of Inspection and Survey with headquarters at Washington DC, and visited almost all the Navy Yards in the United States. In 1915 he was appointed and acted as supervisor of the Harbor of New York. In 1915-1916 he was in command of the USS Utah, which was in the second division of the Atlantic Fleet, operating off the Atlantic Coast. In July 1916 he was ordered to the War College at Newport taking special courses in tactics and strategy. When war broke out with German in 1917 he was appointed a senior member of the Board of Appraisal. On 1 July 1918 he was selected for grade of Rear Admiral and in October he was ordered to France and was made Commander of the district at Brest, France. In January 1918, he relieved Vice Admiral Wilson who was Commander of all the US Naval Forced in France, holding that position until 18 October 1919. He had charge o the demobilization of the aviation stations and Post offices located in Europe. He was decorated by the French Government as Commander of the Legion of Honor. [more bio in the source]

Eleanor V D Adams

Eleanor V D Adams

Photograph and Story: Miss Eleanor V. D. Adams, Sponsor, U.S. S-6. The submarine S-6, the latest and most modern of Uncle Sam’s undersea boats was launched at the navy yard Dec. 23, 1919 …. Miss Eleanor V.D. Adams, the pretty daughter of Captain and Mrs. L.H. Adams, was the sponsor and she performed her duties in a very graceful manner. … The S-6 was ordered constructed by the department in April 1917 and the keel was laid January 30, 1919. The boat is No 111 on the navy list and the fourth of her type to be built here. The ship is 231 feet long and has 13 foot draft and 830 tons surface displacement. [additional info in original story]

 

Photograph and Biography: Captain Henry Lake Wyman. Assistant Industrial Manager, USN (Detached). Capt Henry Lake Wyman, USN born in Evanston IL was

Captain Henry Lake Wyman

Captain Henry Lake Wyman

appointed to the Naval Academy from the state of Illinois on the 6 Sep 1895 and graduated from the Academy 1895 and graduated from the Academy in 1900, as a classmate of the new Asst. Industrial manager, Capt. Snyder, USN. The first assignment of duty given Captain Wyman upon graduation was, as a cadet, to take a course in torpedo handling and construction at Newport Torpedo Station, Newport, RI. Captain Wyman was detached from the Newport Station in December 1900 and ordered to proceed to the Asiatic Station via the Suez Canal upon the FROLIC, one of the vessels of the so-called “Mosquito Squadron.” Captain Wyman’s first duty while serving under this assignment was as Watch Officer of the Frolic. [additional info not listed here]. He served aboard the USS Rainbow, the USS Wisconsin, the USS New Orleans and in 1904 the USS Kearsarge.

 

Captain Charles Philip Synder

Captain Charles Philip Synder

Photograph and Biography: Captain Charles Philip Snyder, Assistant Industrial Manager. Captain Charles Philip Snyder was born in Charleston, West Virginia on July 10, 1879. He was appointed to the Naval Academy from the State of West Virginia on the 20 of May 1896 and graduate in 1900. Upon graduating he was assigned to the Naval Torpedo Station at Newport RI, where he took a special course in torpedo construction. He was assigned to the USS Battleship Alabama, then the USS Chattanooga (this ship was one of the squadron which brought back the body of Paul Jones from France). In 1905 he was assigned duty as instructor in higher mathematics and navigation at the Naval Academy for 2 years. He advanced to Lieut j.g. then Lieutenant. Next he served on the USS Vermont, USS Cleveland, USS Maryland (renamed Frederick). Then he was again at the Naval Academy, and Senior Engineer Officer on the USS Massachusetts. Then assigned Navigator of the Dreadsnaught Delaware serving 3 years. In 1916 he was ordered to Washington DC placed in charge of the Division of Chart Construction in the Hydra-graphic Office. Upon the outbreak of the war (WW1) he was ordered to command the USS Oregon off the Pacific coast. Early in Spring of 1919 he was transferred to the command of the USS Mongolia, and then to the USS Minneapolis. After the signing of the Armistice he took the USS Minneapolis by way of the Panama Canal to the Pacific Ocean. On Nov 26, 1919 reported to duty as the Assistant Industrial Manager of the Portsmouth Navy yard, relieving Captain H.L. Wyman.

Photograph and Biography: Commander Jay Hale Sypher, Aid to the Commandant.

Jay Hale Sypher

Jay Hale Sypher

Commander Jay Hale Sypher was born in New Orleans LA on 15 March 1871. His parents made their home in Pennsylvania. He was appointed in 1887 to the Naval Academy from Arizona, when that state was still a territory, and was graduated from the Naval Academy in 1891. His first cruise as a Midshipman was on the USS Newark. As a Midshipman on the old Kearsarge he first visited the Portsmouth Navy Yard (that old ship was built on the Portsmouth Navy yard). Commander Sypher served several times at the Asiatic Station and crossed the Pacific during the Spanish War, as an officer on the Monitor Monadnock. In 1895 he was ordered to the War College where he took the full course. In 1906 he was made Lieut. Commander and ordered to the Battleship Missouri as navigating officer, and later assigned duty of Superintendent of Compasses at the Naval Observatory in Washington DC. While holding the rank he was directly responsible for the introduction of the gyro-compass in the American Navy….. In 1911 he was made Commander and was immediately ordered as Executive Officer to the USS Florida which was being built at the New York Navy Yard and which at the time was the newest and finest dreadnought in our navy. After 2 years on the USS Florida he was ordered to command the battleship Missouri, on which vessel he made a trip around the world as navigator. He was assigned Senior Assistant to the Aid for Material at Washington DC. In 1915 he was ordered to the Asiatic Station as Chief of Staff, then later to Ireland placed in command of the reserve base for supplying men to the destroyers operating from Queensland. He was decorated for excellent service by the Prince of Wales during the trip of HRH to America, and made a “Commander of the Order of the British Empire.” He returned to America and reported to the Portsmouth Navy Yard as Aide to the Commandant.

 

Lucien Frank Kimball

Lucien Frank Kimball

Photograph and Biography: Commander Lucien Frank Kimball USN. Commander Lucien Frank Kimball, USN was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts on 23 June 1885. He was appointed in 1902 to the Naval Academy from the state of Vermont and was graduated on the 12th of September 1906. Upon graduation he was assigned as Midshipman on the USS Georgia for 2 years, followed by assignments on the USS Panther, USS South Carolina, USS Wheeling. July 1913 he was assigned duty as Outside Superintendent of Machinery Division of the Boston Navy Yard (until July 1915), and advanced to Lieutenant Senior grade. In July 1915 Commander Kimball was assigned to the USS San Francisco, then the USS Olympia, and USS Machias. He was involved in the testing of mines. He was ordered to the Plymouth Navy Yard on May 22, 1919 as Engineering Superintendent.

 

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